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I am writing some code that essentially performs setup operations for industrial automation equipment. The setup that is performed is basically individually setting thousands and thousands of parameters on the equipment.

You could think of much of the code as a collection of routines that look something like:

foo_set_x{
foo_param_1 = 1
foo_param_2 = 2
….
}

NOTE: THE ABOVE IS AN EXTREMELY SIMPLIFIED EXAMPLE

As new projects occur, some parameters change and some do not. So when the customer uses this setup utility they answer a question on which parameter specification to use.

Now some routines change to this:

foo_set_x{
IF param_spec_1 {
foo_param_1 = 1
….
}
IF param_spec_2 {
foo_param_1 = 2
….
}
}

And some routines change to this:

foo_set_y{
IF param_spec_1 OR param_spec_2 {
foo_param_1 = 1
foo_param_2 = 2
….
}
}

So each time a new parameter spec comes along, I have to change code in hundreds of routines to support the new spec. To me this doesn’t seem like an intelligent way to approach this.

The only solution that I can think of is to create variables for each parameter. Then all my routines do is set the parameter to the variable. No IF or CASE statement would be required.

The issue is there are, and I kid you not, close to 5,000 different parameters. Since I am working with a fairly limited and primitive language (NOT OOP, but C based) each variable would have to be global and would suck down a lot of precious space. I can’t even begin to fathom how I could create an intelligent variable listing of some 5,000 variables (minus what makes sense to put in a structure or array).

Thanks all.

P.S. Please feel free to edit or suggest better tags. I'm kind of lost here.

share|improve this question
    
5000?!?!?! Is your stack going to be large enough? –  Mysticial Jan 6 '12 at 21:16
    
For me global variables are not stored in what I believe would equate to RAM on a PC. I get to store them in non-volatile flash memory. –  user432209 Jan 6 '12 at 21:24
    
Ah ok. I was under some impression that they would be passed around or declared inside a function. –  Mysticial Jan 6 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

There are two approaches I'd consider:

One is the data-driven approach, where each param_spec has a struct (or array) containing all the appropriate variables. You say this will suck up a lot of space, but it could only be CODE (= ROM) space that it consumes, because your structures can be constants. And, you'll probably save a load of code space in exchange.

foo_set_x{
  foo_param_1 = param_specs[spec_index].foo_param_1;
}

The other way is a pseudo OO approach. Remember that real programmers can write OO code in any language! Each param spec defines it's own functions for each our your foo_set_xyzzy routines, and foo_set_x then just calls the correct one. This has the advantage that all the changes for a particular param set can be kept in one place.

ps1_foo_set_x() {   foo_param_1 = 1; }

ps2_foo_set_x() {   foo_param_1 = 2; }

void (*foo_set_x)(void);

void select_ps1 {  foo_set_x = ps1_foo_set_x; }

void select_ps2 {  foo_set_x = ps2_foo_set_x; }

...

foo_set_x();
share|improve this answer
    
This is really interesting. Is there a name for this technique (my C is terrible)? I'm not sure how foo_set_x() can use both methods. Thanks. –  user432209 Jan 31 '12 at 0:55

Better store the value of parameters in a light-weight database like SQLite, which you can bundle and ship with your application.

SQLite provides C-API using which you can store/retrieve your parameters in db.

when your customer answers specifications

foo_set_x{
IF param_spec_1 {
// write in db for spec_1
….
}
IF param_spec_2 {
// write in db for spec_2
….
}
}

you can store all those 5000 parameters in plain text file, but I would recommend you to use a light-weight database which you can ship with your application because file-read will be sequential and will be a performance drawback. if you store your parameters in a database, they will be indexed by the database, therefore fast retrieval but ofcourse you need to write a little bit more code to achieve and maintain it.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately for me, I have no databasing capabilities. I would have to write some sort of text file or XML parser. The difficult part is I would still have to equate some sort of variable name inside the text file. Tough with so many variables. Worth considering though I guess. –  user432209 Jan 6 '12 at 21:31
    
By saying I have no databasing capabilities, I assume the decision of using database is not in your hands but of your organisation? anyways, if you ask me for option between text files and XML, i would recommend using XML and parse it using a SAX parser. The reason for suggesting SAX parser, since it is faster and you dont have to load the entire XML in the memory for parsing. –  Rajesh Rao Jan 6 '12 at 21:38

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