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I'm writing a program in C# that needs to repeatedly access 1 image file. Most of the time it works, but if my computer's running fast, it will try to access the file before it's been saved back to the filesystem and throw an error: "File in use by another process".

I would like to find a way around this, but all my Googling has only yielded creating checks by using exception handling. This is against my religion, so I was wondering if anyone has a better way of doing it?

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14  
All right, you can test it by examining all the open handles on the system. However, since Windows is a multitasking operating system, there is a chance that right after you run the code to determine if the file is open and you deem it is not, a process code start using that file, then by the time you try to use it, you receive an error. But, there is nothing wrong with checking first; just don't assume it is not in use when you actually need it. –  BobbyShaftoe May 18 '09 at 6:45
3  
But just for this specific issue; I'd recommend not examining the file handles and just try some preset number of times, say 3-5 before failing. –  BobbyShaftoe May 18 '09 at 6:46
    
How is this image file generated? Can you stop/sleep/pause your program until the generation is completed? That is by far a superior way to handle the situation. If not, then I don't think you can avoid using exception handling. –  Catchwa May 18 '09 at 6:48
4  
Your philosophy has a bad understanding of exceptions. Most people think exceptions means holy-crap-out-of-doom-something's-wrong-die-die-die. When exception means.... exception. It means something exceptional occurred that you need to "handle" (or account for). Maybe you want to keep retrying for data access, maybe the user needs to know that you can't get a connection. What do you do? You handle the ConnectionFailedException and notify the user, so maybe, they'll stop trying after an hour, and notice the cable is unplugged. –  Lee Louviere Mar 11 '13 at 15:28
1  
@JonLimjap if you are going to make fun of the OP's approach, at least provide a more robust solution. –  David C Jun 13 '13 at 15:25

13 Answers 13

up vote 187 down vote accepted

I've used this code for the past several years, and I haven't had any issues with it.

Understand your hesitation about using exceptions, but you can't avoid them all of the time:

protected virtual bool IsFileLocked(FileInfo file)
{
    FileStream stream = null;

    try
    {
        stream = file.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //the file is unavailable because it is:
        //still being written to
        //or being processed by another thread
        //or does not exist (has already been processed)
        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
            stream.Close();
    }

    //file is not locked
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
36  
This is a great solution, but I have one comment - you may wan't to open the File with access mode FileAccess.Read since ReadWrite will always fail if the file happens to be read-only. –  adeel825 Jan 29 '10 at 1:28
121  
-1. This is a poor answer, because the file could become locked by another thread/process after it is closed in IsFileLocked, and before your thread gets a chance to open it. –  ShellShock May 26 '10 at 15:58
7  
I think this is a great answer. I'm using this as an extension method á la public static bool IsLocked(this FileInfo file) {/*...*/}. –  Manuzor Jul 4 '12 at 11:06
29  
@ChrisW: you might be wondering what is going on. Do not be alarmed. You're just being subject to the wrath of the Daily WTF community: thedailywtf.com/Comments/… –  Pierre Lebeaupin Mar 11 '13 at 13:15
5  
@ChrisW Why is that a bad thing. This community is here to point out good and bad answers. If a bunch of professionals notice this is a bad thing, and join to downvote, then the site is WAI. And before you get negative, if you read that article, they say to "upvote the right answer" not downvote the wrong one. Do you want them to explain their upvotes in comments as well. Thanks for introducing me to another good site! –  Lee Louviere Mar 11 '13 at 15:12

You can suffer from a thread race condition on this which there are documented examples of this being used as a security vulnerability. If you check that the file is available, but then try and use it you could throw at that point, which a malicious user could use to force and exploit in your code.

Your best bet is a try catch / finally which tries to get the file handle.

try
{
   using (Stream stream = new FileStream("MyFilename.txt", FileMode.Open))
   {
        // File/Stream manipulating code here
   }
} catch {
  //check here why it failed and ask user to retry if the file is in use.
}
share|improve this answer
65  
+1. There is no 100% safe way to "learn if a file is in use" because milliseconds after you do the check, the file may not be in use anymore, or vice versa. Instead, you just open the file and use it if there are no exceptions. –  ssg Jan 4 '11 at 7:16
4  
Too bad .NET doesn't support CAS. Something like, TryOpenFile(Ref FileHandle) that returns success/failure. There should always be a work-around not rely on exception handling alone. I wonder how Microsoft Office does it. –  TamusJRoyce Jul 31 '11 at 22:37
19  
The using statement is to ensure the stream is closed after I'm done. I think you'll find that the using() {} is less characters than try {} finally { obj.Dispose() }. You'll also find that you now need to declare your object reference outside the using statement, which is more typing. If you have a explicit interface you'd also have to cast. Finally you want to dispose ASAP, and the finally logic may have UI or any other long running actions that have little to do with calling IDispose. </rant> –  Spence Nov 27 '12 at 20:01
1  
that doesn't negate the fact that you have to declare your object outside the try and have to explicitly call dispose, which using does for you and means the same thing. –  Spence Jan 31 '13 at 0:27
1  
@HarryJohnston // File/Stream manipulating code here - you're supposed to use the file (read/write/etc.) within the try block, thereby avoiding the race condition where another process can lock the file between the check and open - because the check and open is one atomic operation here. –  Bob Mar 13 '13 at 10:57

I know this thread is old, but use this to check if a file is locked:

FileStream stream = null;
try
{
stream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
}
catch (IOException ex)
{
   if (IsFileLocked(ex))
   {
    // do something? 
   } 
}
finally // don't forget close the stream, if you wish to use this file later
{
if (stream != null)
    stream.Close();
}


const int ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION = 32;
const int ERROR_LOCK_VIOLATION = 33;

private static bool IsFileLocked(Exception exception)
{
    int errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(exception) & ((1 << 16) - 1);
    return errorCode == ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION || errorCode == ERROR_LOCK_VIOLATION;
}
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2  
I would upvote if there weren't so many "magic numbers" in there en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_number_(programming) –  Kris Mar 11 '13 at 21:27
4  
@Kris meh cant you read bit shifts, lol –  Jeremy Thompson Mar 15 '13 at 1:54
1  
I was referring to the errorCode comparisons, not the bit shifts. though now you mention it... –  Kris Mar 15 '13 at 9:35
1  
Your Catch should be on IOException, instead of on general Exception and then a test on type. –  Askolein Apr 22 '13 at 14:31
2  
@JeremyThompson sadly you put the specific IOException after the general one. The general one will catch everything passing by and the specific IOException will always be lonely. Just swap the two. –  Askolein Jun 18 '13 at 13:48

Here's a powershell version of the accepted answer.

function IsFileLocked($filename) {

    $result = $false

    $fileinfo = [System.IO.FileInfo] (gi $filename).fullname

    try {
        $stream = $fileInfo.Open([System.IO.FileMode]"Open",[System.IO.FileAccess]"ReadWrite",[System.IO.FileShare]"None")
        $stream.Dispose()
    } catch [System.IO.IOException] {
        $result = $true
    }

    $result
}
share|improve this answer

Perhaps you could use a FileSystemWatcher and watch for the Changed event.

I haven't used this myself, but it might be worth a shot. If the filesystemwatcher turns out to be a bit heavy for this case, I would go for the try/catch/sleep loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a FileSystemWatcher does not help, because the Created and Changed events raise at the beginning of a file creation/change. Even small files need more time to be written and closed by the operating system than the .NET application needs to run through the FileSystemEventHandler Callback. This is so sad, but there is no other option than to estimate the wait time before accessing the file or run into exception loops... –  user219337 Jul 8 '11 at 12:29
    
FileSystemWatcher doesn't handle lots of changes at the same time very well though, so be careful with that. –  elbekko Jun 20 '12 at 7:59
1  
BTW, have you guys noticed while debugging and watching threads that MS calls their own FSW "FileSystemWather"? What's a wather anyway? –  lorddev Apr 22 '13 at 0:29

the only way I know of is to use the Win32 exclusive lock API which isn't too speedy, but examples exist.

Most people, for a simple solution to this, simply to try/catch/sleep loops.

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static bool FileInUse(string path)
    {
        try
        {
            using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
            {
                fs.CanWrite
            }
            return false;
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

string filePath = "C:\\Documents And Settings\\yourfilename";
bool isFileInUse;

isFileInUse = FileInUse(filePath);

// Then you can do some checking
if (isFileInUse)
   Console.WriteLine("File is in use");
else
   Console.WriteLine("File is not in use");

Hope this helps!

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2  
The actual check you perform is fine; putting it inside a function is misleading. You do NOT want to use a function like this prior to opening a file. Inside the function, the file is opened, checked, and closed. Then the programmer ASSUMES the file is STILL ok to use and tries opening it for use. This is bad because it could be used and locked by another process that was queued up to open this file. Between the 1st time it was opened (for checking) and the 2nd time it was opened (for use), the OS could have descheduled your process and could be running another process. –  Lakey Mar 25 '13 at 19:50

In my experience, you usually want to do this, then 'protect' your files to do something fancy and then use the 'protected' files. If you have just one file you want to use like this, you can use the trick that's explained in the answer by Jeremy Thompson. However, if you attempt to do this on lots of files (say, for example when you're writing an installer), you're in for quite a bit of hurt.

A very elegant way this can be solved is by using the fact that your file system will not allow you to change a folder name if one of the files there it's being used. Keep the folder in the same file system and it'll work like a charm.

Do note that you should be aware of the obvious ways this can be exploited. After all, the files won't be locked. Also, be aware that there are other reasons that can result in your Move operation to fail. Obviously proper error handling (MSDN) can help out here.

var originalFolder = @"c:\myHugeCollectionOfFiles"; // your folder name here
var someFolder = Path.Combine(originalFolder, "..", Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N"));

try
{
    Directory.Move(originalFolder, someFolder);

    // Use files
}
catch // TODO: proper exception handling
{
    // Inform user, take action
}
finally
{
    Directory.Move(someFolder, originalFolder);
}

For individual files I'd stick with the locking suggestion posted by Jeremy Thompson.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Since the order of answers changes can you clarify which post above you mean for readers of this popular QA. Thanks. –  Jeremy Thompson Nov 21 at 11:02
1  
@JeremyThompson You're right, thanks, I'll edit the post. I'd use the solution from you, mainly because of your correct use of FileShare and checking for a lock. –  atlaste Nov 21 at 11:09

Try and move/copy the file to a temp dir. If you can, it has no lock and you can safely work in the temp dir without getting locks. Else just try to move it again in x seconds.

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What if something locks it right after you move the file? –  jcolebrand Mar 11 '13 at 14:27
    
@jcolebrand locks what? the one you copied? Or the one you put in the temp dir? –  cullub Aug 7 at 17:23
    
if you copy the file, expecting nobody else to be working on it, and you're going to use the temp file, and then someone locks it right after you copy it, then you've potentially lost data. –  jcolebrand Aug 7 at 21:07

I use this workaround, but i have a timespan between when i check the file locking with IsFileLocked function and when i open the file. In this timespan some other thread can open the file, so i will get IOException.

So, i added extra code for this. In my case i want load XDocument:

        XDocument xDoc = null;

        while (xDoc == null)
        {
            while (IsFileBeingUsed(_interactionXMLPath))
            {
                Logger.WriteMessage(Logger.LogPrioritet.Warning, "Deserialize can not open XML file. is being used by another process. wait...");
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
            try
            {
                xDoc = XDocument.Load(_interactionXMLPath);
            }
            catch
            {
                Logger.WriteMessage(Logger.LogPrioritet.Error, "Load working!!!!!");
            }
        }

What do you think? Can i change some thing? Maybe i did not have to use IsFileBeingUsed function at all?

Thanks

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2  
what is IsFileBeingUsed ? source code about IsFileBeingUsed ? –  Kiquenet Jul 30 '13 at 6:01

if you need to avoid the catch and throw block, you could have string list , that adds the path and the state of the file (whether its opened or not ) . so you can check whether the path is accessed or not from the state of the path stored in the string list. I hope what I am suggesting is right , if its very relevant my bad.

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why the downvote?? –  cullub Aug 7 at 17:24

Have you heard of a sigleton class. if you force all your image manipulations through this class and queue all the function calls, you will have atomicity. the only problem with this is that you need to host the class in a process.

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I had a similar problem and did something that seemed to work, it was using exception handling though...

I put a counter in to keep trying 100 times to stop endless loop.

See below...

    private void uploadFiles(string filename)
    {
        try
        {
            string fromFileAndPath = Properties.Settings.Default.Path + "\\" + filename;
            string toFileAndPath = Properties.Settings.Default.CopyLocation + "\\" + filename;
            if (!File.Exists(toFileAndPath))
            {
                FileInfo imgInfo = new FileInfo(fromFileAndPath);
                bool copied = false;
                int counter = 0;
                while (!copied && counter < 100) //While was added as I was getting "The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process" errors.
                {
                    try
                    {
                        counter++;
                        imgInfo.CopyTo(toFileAndPath);
                        copied = true;
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        //If it cannot copy catch
                    }
                }
                if (counter > 100)
                    throw new Exception("Unable to copy file!");
                Thread.Sleep(1);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("An error occurred: " + ex.Message, "Error!", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
6  
If the file is locked, you try to open the file 100 times in a blocking loop... This will freeze your program from being used during these checks, and by the way is completely pointless because the CPU can only run one process at a time. There's no guarantee the OS will even switch to another process to allow the file to close during this loop! You might as well check a million times; the file won't close until your program releases control of the CPU to another process. What you should do is schedule a asynchronous callback that will check again after certain amount of time has passed. –  Lakey Mar 25 '13 at 19:45
    
I added a sleep to address the issue. –  mafu Mar 29 '13 at 17:49
3  
Using sleep to try and simulate threaded functionality? (lol) Also, that hardly changes anything. It's just a cheep hack that will be inconsistent at best. Your entire design is simply bad. No offense. –  Lakey Apr 3 '13 at 20:22
    
@Lakey what do you mean 'no offense'? Do you have suggestions? –  cullub Aug 7 at 17:26
    
@cullub Yes, read 2 comments up. I suggested using an asynchronous callback. Most modern programming languages have either manual threads you can start, or some kind of callback system. .NET has both, but this particular SO question is not the place to go into a tutorial on how to implement threading. –  Lakey Aug 12 at 2:15

protected by Chris Lively Mar 11 '13 at 19:01

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