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Can anyone point out why this implementation of quick sort is not working, i have gone through it several times and can't seem to find the error

int quickPartition ( int data[], int p, int r)
{
    int x=data[r];
    int i=p-1;
    for (int j=p; j<r; j++)
    {
        if(data[j]<x)
        {
            i++;
            int temp=data[i];
            data[i]=data[j];
            data[j]=temp;
        }
        int temp=data[i+1];
        data[i+1]=data[r];
        data[r]=temp;   
    }
    i++;
    cout<<"i:"<<i<<endl;
    return i;
}

void myQuickSort(int data[], int left, int right)
{       
    if(left<right)
    {
        int q=quickPartition(data,left,right);
        myQuickSort(data,left,q-1);
        myQuickSort(data,q+1,right);
    }
}

the call to quicksort is simply

myQuickSort(anArray,0,size-1);
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2  
What do you mean not working? Does it not compile? Does it give you a segmentation fault? Is it not sorting properly? If it is not sorting properly, can you give an example? –  Donald Miner Jan 6 '12 at 21:53
    
I think you could do your quicksort in a simple way, by using a recursive concatenation of sorted arrays (yeah I know, not easy to read..) –  Jeremy D Jan 6 '12 at 22:07
    
any particular reason you are not using std::sort? –  Zac Jan 6 '12 at 22:16
    
@sola: what value of size fails? –  wallyk Jan 6 '12 at 22:26
    
Is this homework? If not, why would you write your own quicksort instead of using std::sort? (by the way for swapping values you might also want to take a look at std::swap). And most importantly: how exactly does it fail? –  Grizzly Jan 6 '12 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Methinks

    int temp=data[i+1];
    data[i+1]=data[r];
    data[r]=temp;

should go outside the for loop.

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you're right, thanks for spotting the mistake –  sola Jan 6 '12 at 22:51

Your implementation of partition looks entirely bogus. What you want is iterate from both ends and on each end find an object which belongs to the opposite part. If the iterators meet, you are done. Otherwise you swap the two objects and find the next pair.

Personally, I can't think properly in the abstractions you are using: I have a much easier time to think in terms of iterators pointing to the respective objects and finding the next object to swap should be functions as well. Also, I need to factor things into small, comprehensible bits. You swap objects at some point. This should be a separate function. With this partition() would look something like this:

int* partition(int* left, int* right, int value) {
    while (left != right)
    {
         left = find_forward(left, right, value);
         right = find_backward(left, right, value);
         if (left != right)
         {
             swap(left, right);
         }
    }
    return left;
}

I haven't tested this but something along those lines should work. Obviously, I would just use std::swap() to swap elements and std::find_if() to find suitable locations (for the backward case using std::reverse_iterator). Well, if this weren't a homework assignment you would just use std::sort() anyway: it doesn't use a vanilla quick-sort but a variation which detects that it is running into a bad case and uses std::heap_sort() in this case to guarantee that it stays O(n log n).

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I think his partition works alright. If you apply Daniel Fischer's modification: ideone.com/eBygm –  BlackJack Jan 6 '12 at 22:44
    
@BlackJack: if you need to modify it so it works it obviously doesn't work alright ;) I see that your modification isn't dramatic but I also think that this version does too many swaps: assume that all elements are smaller than "x". It then swaps each individual element although the sequence is already properly partitioned. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 6 '12 at 22:55
    
Yup. It's less efficient than scanning from both ends, but it's correct. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 6 '12 at 22:58

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