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There are many ways to do this but I feel like I've missed a function or something.

Obviously List == List will use Object.Equals() and return false.

If every element of the list is equal and present in the same location in the opposite list then I would consider them to be equal. I'm using value types, but a correctly implemented Data object should work in the same fashion (i.e I'm not looking for a shallow copied list, only that the value of each object within is the same).

I've tried searching and there are similar questions, but my question is an equality of every element, in an exact order.

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1  
Similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/308476/… – Joel in Gö May 18 '09 at 7:06
    
Thanks for letting me know. – Spence May 18 '09 at 7:11
up vote 34 down vote accepted
Enumerable.SequenceEqual<TSource>

MSDN

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using System.Linq; Will that throw if the sequences are of differing length or they are out of order etc? – Spence May 18 '09 at 7:05
    
This method asks a question, so it shouldn't provide the answer by throwing. The only reason it should throw is if either of the sequences is a null reference. – Daniel Earwicker May 18 '09 at 7:07
    
sorry asked too quickly. Will it return false if the sequences are of different length or out of order? – Spence May 18 '09 at 7:09
1  
@Spence - Yes, SequenceEqual returns false when the sequences are different lengths or out-of-order: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb348567.aspx – LukeH May 18 '09 at 9:12
    
@Luke, out of order was not asked. – leppie May 18 '09 at 10:06

Evil implementation is

if (List1.Count == List2.Count)
{
   for(int i = 0; i < List1.Count; i++)
   {
      if(List1[i] != List2[i])
      {
         return false;
      }
   }
   return true;
}
return false;
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1  
This is almost exactly how the built-in SequenceEqual method works, as in leppie's answer. (Your version will return slightly faster than SequenceEqual if the collections have different lengths but it's restricted to IList<T>, whereas SequenceEqual will work with any IEnumerable<T>.) – LukeH May 18 '09 at 11:00

I knocked up a quick extension method:

namespace ExtensionMethods
{
    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static bool Matches<T>(this List<T> list1, List<T> list2)
        {
            if (list1.Count != list2.Count) return false;
            for (var i = 0; i < list1.Count; i++)
            {
                if (list1[i] != list2[i]) return false;
            }
            return true;
        }
    }   
}
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I put together this variation:

private bool AreEqual<T>(List<T> x, List<T> y)
{
    // same list or both are null
    if (x == y)
    {
        return true;
    }

    // one is null (but not the other)
    if (x== null || y == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // count differs; they are not equal
    if (x.Count != y.Count)
    {
        return false;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < x.Count; i++)
    {
        if (!x[i].Equals(y[i]))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

The nerd in me also crawled out so I did a performance test against SequenceEquals, and this one has a slight edge.

Now, the question to ask; is this tiny, almost measurable performance gain worth adding the code to the code base and maintaining it? I very much doubt it ;o)

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One can write a general purpose IEqualityComparer<T> for sequences. A simple one:

public class SequenceEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<IEnumerable<T>>
{
    public bool Equals(IEnumerable<T> x, IEnumerable<T> y)
    {
        return x.SequenceEqual(y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(IEnumerable<T> obj)
    {
        return unchecked(obj.Aggregate(397, (x, y) => x * 31 + y.GetHashCode()));
    }
}

A more fleshed out version: which should be better performing.

public class SequenceEqualityComparer<T> : EqualityComparer<IEnumerable<T>>, 
                                           IEquatable<SequenceEqualityComparer<T>>
{
    readonly IEqualityComparer<T> comparer;

    public SequenceEqualityComparer(IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
    {
        this.comparer = comparer ?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    }

    public override bool Equals(IEnumerable<T> x, IEnumerable<T> y)
    {
        // safer to use ReferenceEquals as == could be overridden
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y))
            return true;

        if (x == null || y == null)
            return false;

        var xICollection = x as ICollection<T>;
        if (xICollection != null)
        {
            var yICollection = y as ICollection<T>;
            if (yICollection != null)
            {
                if (xICollection.Count != yICollection.Count)
                    return false;

                var xIList = x as IList<T>;
                if (xIList != null)
                {
                    var yIList = y as IList<T>;
                    if (yIList != null)
                    {
                        // optimization - loops from bottom
                        for (int i = xIList.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
                            if (!comparer.Equals(xIList[i], yIList[i]))
                                return false;

                        return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return x.SequenceEqual(y, comparer);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(IEnumerable<T> sequence)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 397;
            foreach (var item in sequence)
                hash = hash * 31 + comparer.GetHashCode(item);

            return hash;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(SequenceEqualityComparer<T> other)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, other))
            return false;

        if (ReferenceEquals(this, other))
            return true;

        return this.comparer.Equals(other.comparer);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as SequenceEqualityComparer<T>);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return comparer.GetHashCode();
    }
}

This has a few features:

  1. The comparison is done from bottom to top. There is more probability for collections differing at the end in typical use-cases.

  2. An IEqualityComparer<T> can be passed to base the comparison for items in the collection.

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