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Ok, I can't get this code work: I want to concatenate my custom manipulators. so they will be called like cout << endl is called. for example I want this:

   emit << event1 << event2 << event3;

here is my code:

class Emit
{
public:
                // ...
    const void operator<<(const Event& _event) const;
}const emit; // note this global

inline const void Emit::operator<<(const Event& _event) const
{
    Start(_event);
}


class Event 
{
               // ...
         const Event& Event::operator<<(const Event& _event) const;
};

inline const Event& Event::operator<<(const Event& _event) const
{
    return _event;
}

However I cant call this:

 emit << event1 << event2 << event3;

I'm eather receiving compile time error, link time errors and what ever I change in my code I get coresponding error no success.

for example this one:

Error 1 error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'const EventHandling::Event' (or there is no acceptable conversion) c:\users\admin\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\cppsystem\eventhandling\test.h 18

thanks alot.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Those operators are called from left to right. As such, the first call (emit << event1) must return a reference to Emit:

class Emit
{
public:
    // ...
    Emit const& operator<<(const Event& _event) const;
}const emit; // note this global

Emit const& Emit::operator<<(const Event& _event) const
{
    Start(_event);
    return *this;
}

And now you don't need to overload operator<< in your Event class anymore.

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ahahah :D I get it now, thanks alot Xeo, you just saved my keyboard's life! your code work like a charm. –  codekiddy Jan 6 '12 at 22:48

If your manipulators don't contain any data you can actually just write a function. For example, std::endl is implemented roughly like this (it needs to cope with wide streams as well and thus does some magic to arrange for characters be converted):

std::ostream& endl(std::ostream& out) {
    (out << '\n').flush();
    return out;
}

If your manipulators have some data you need to store the data in a suitable object and then just create a normal output operator for this class, for example std::setw() could be implemented like this (again, ignoring that the streams are actually templates):

struct std::setw {
    setw(int size): size_(size) {}
    int size_;
};
std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& out, std::setw const& object) {
    out.width(object.size_);
    return out;
}

You can implement output operators as a member because you don't control the left side of the operator<<(): this is where the stream object sits. If you were implementing std::ostream you could implement these members (well, actually, the standard mandates that certain output operators are members of std::ostream).

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Oh, thanks alot for that valuable info, vote+, but I've allready accepted the answer from Xeo since he posted in a minit. thanks again!! –  codekiddy Jan 6 '12 at 22:52

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