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I have the following list of pairs of data:

pairs = {{3, "John"}, {1, "Bob"}, {2, "Jane"}, {1, "Beth"}};

I would like to find the pair of data with the minimum first value. In the example above the pair I am looking for is: {1, "Bob"} or {1, "Beth"}, but not both of them.

I can use Sort[pairs, #1[[1]] < #2[[1]] &][[1]] to accomplish this. However, since even the fastest sorts having a big O > O(n), it leads me to think there has to be a more efficient way to do this.

The following gives me the correct answer:

minPair = pairs[[1]];
Map[Function[x, If[x[[1]] < minPair[[1]], minPair = x]], pairs];
minPair;

but, it is slower than using Sort above. I know, my Mathematica-fu is just not there yet, hence my question.

Timings

SetAttributes[TimingDo, HoldRest];
TimingDo[note_String, func_] := 
  results = 
   Append[results, {note , func, Timing[Do[func, {iterations}]][[1]]}];

pairs = {{3, "John"}, {1, "Bob "}, {2, "Jane"}, {1, "Beth"}};
results = {};
iterations = 10000;

TimingDo[ "mmorris[Sort]:               ",
  Sort[pairs, #1[[1]] < #2[[1]] &][[1]]];

TimingDo["mmorris[Map]:                ",
  minPair = pairs[[1]];
  Map[Function[x, If[x[[1]] < minPair[[1]], minPair = x;]], pairs];
  minPair];

TimingDo["mmorris[Map2]:               ",
  minPair = pairs[[1]];
  minValue = minPair[[1]];
  Map[Function[x, 
    If[x[[1]] < minValue, minPair = x; minValue = minPair[[1]];]], 
   pairs];
  minPair];

TimingDo["Mike Honeychurch[Position]:  ",
  pairs[[Position[pairs, Min[pairs[[All, 1]]]][[1, 1]]]]];

TimingDo["Mike Honeychurch[Ordering]:  ",
  pairs[[First@Ordering[pairs[[All, 1]]]]]];

TimingDo["Mike Honeychurch[Ordering']: ",
  pairs[[First@Ordering[pairs[[All, 1]], 1]]]];

TimingDo["Mike Honeychurch[SortBy]:    ",
  SortBy[pairs, First][[1]]];

cf = Compile[{{in, _Integer, 1}}, Block[{x, pos}, x = Part[in, 1];
    pos = 0;
    Do[If[Part[in, i] < x, x = Part[in, i];
       pos = i;];, {i, Length[in]}];
    pos]];

TimingDo["ruebenko[Compile]:           ",
  {p1, p2} = Developer`ToPackedArray /@ Transpose[pairs];
  pairs[[cf[p1]]]];

TimingDo[ "ruebenko[Ordering]:          ",
  {p1, p2} = Developer`ToPackedArray /@ Transpose[pairs];
  pairs[[Ordering[p1][[1]]]]];

TimingDo["TomD[Select]:                ",
  Select[pairs, #[[1]] == Min[pairs[[All, 1]]] &, 1][[1]]];

TimingDo["TomD[Function]:              ",
  (Function[xx, Select[xx, #[[1]] == Min[xx[[All, 1]]] &, 1]]@
     pairs)[[1]]];

Map[Print, Sort[results, #1[[3]] < #2[[3]] &]];

Results (List size of 4)

pairs = {{3, "John"}, {1, "Bob "}, {2, "Jane"}, {1, "Beth"}};

{Mike Honeychurch[Ordering']: ,{1,Bob },0.01381}

{Mike Honeychurch[Ordering]:  ,{1,Bob },0.016171}

{Mike Honeychurch[SortBy]:    ,{1,Beth},0.036649}

{TomD[Select]:                ,{1,Bob },0.042448}

{Mike Honeychurch[Position]:  ,{1,Bob },0.042909}

{ruebenko[Ordering]:          ,{1,Bob },0.048088}

{ruebenko[Compile]:           ,{1,Bob },0.050277}

{TomD[Function]:              ,{1,Bob },0.054296}

{mmorris[Sort]:               ,{1,Beth},0.06838}

{mmorris[Map2]:               ,{1,Bob },0.117905}

{mmorris[Map]:                ,{1,Bob },0.119051}

Results (List size of 1000)

pairs = RandomInteger[1000, {1000, 2}];

{Mike Honeychurch[Ordering']: ,{0,217},0.236041}

{ruebenko[Compile]:           ,{0,217},0.416627}

{ruebenko[Ordering]:          ,{0,217},0.675427}

{Mike Honeychurch[Ordering]:  ,{0,217},0.771243}

{Mike Honeychurch[SortBy]:    ,{0,217},2.68054}

{Mike Honeychurch[Position]:  ,{0,217},2.70455}

{mmorris[Map2]:               ,{0,217},26.7715}

{mmorris[Map]:                ,{0,217},29.8413}

{mmorris[Sort]:               ,{0,217},98.1023}

{TomD[Function]:              ,{0,217},115.968}

{TomD[Select]:                ,{0,217},116.78}
share|improve this question
    
What is the length of your real life lists? –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 6 '12 at 23:46
    
@MikeHoneychurch Real life list size for this application is any where between 1 (yes 1) and 20 items in the list. –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 0:21
    
Ordering will probably be your fastest method I think. If the list length is only up to ~20 then no packing needed. There is overhead in packing lists so for small lists it will make things slower. Rule of thumb I use is length of ~250. –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 7 '12 at 2:36
    
@mmorris, you timings are not really useful, because the pairs list you use is so short. If you try the timings with a much longer list you will get different results. (Omit the first method or it will never finish.) –  Mr.Wizard Jan 12 '12 at 12:32
    
@Mr.Wizard The timing information is relevant to the specific question I asked. Which was clarified in comment #2. However, I do not disagree with you that the timing results will vary depending up the context of the problem. Hence why I included the source code for all the answers submitted so the context can be tweaked as the situation dictates. This way people can find the solution that best fits their context. –  mmorris Jan 12 '12 at 14:27
show 2 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can find all the minimums like this:

pos = Position[pairs, Min[pairs[[All, 1]]]]

pairs[[pos[[All, 1]]]]

If you only want one of them then

pos = Position[pairs, Min[pairs[[All, 1]]]][[1, 1]]

pairs[[pos]]

On my machine this is faster than the methods listed in your question and I would expect it to be much faster for larger lists.

Edit

Actually this is faster still -- for your small list.

pos = First@Ordering[pairs[[All, 1]]];
pairs[[pos]]

Best to test all these on your real life lists for timings. (Note also that SortBy[pairs,First] is faster than Sort)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! See my question for the results. –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 3:46
1  
While dissecting your answer ... I think I found an improvement: pairs[[First@Ordering[pairs[[All, 1]], 1]]] –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 4:38
    
I just split it, and the others, into 2 lines for clarity –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 7 '12 at 5:57
    
Not the split, the second argument to Ordering that limits it to only n results, in this case I only need 1. –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 6:05
    
ok. sorry I missed that in your comment. Yes that seems about 5-10% faster. –  Mike Honeychurch Jan 7 '12 at 6:28
show 2 more comments

How about this:

pairs = {{3, "John"}, {1, "Bob"}, {2, "Jane"}, {1, "Beth"}};
{p1, p2} = Developer`ToPackedArray /@ Transpose[pairs]

cf = Compile[{{in, _Integer, 1}}, Block[{x, pos},
   x = Part[in, 1];
   pos = 0;
   Do[
    If[Part[in, i] < x,
      x = Part[in, i];
      pos = i;
      ];
    , {i, Length[in]}];
   pos
   ]]


pairs[[cf[p1]]]

The best you can expect is O(n) since, you have to walk the list once, to find the min value.

Here is a second idea:

pairs = {{3, "John"}, {1, "Bob"}, {2, "Jane"}, {1, "Beth"}};
{p1, p2} = Developer`ToPackedArray /@ Transpose[pairs]
ord = Ordering[p1]
pairs[[ord[[1]]]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! See my question for the results. –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 3:46
add comment
Select[pairs, #[[1]] == Min[pairs[[All, 1]]] &, 1]

gives

{{1, "Bob"}}

or, alternatively:

Function[xx, Select[xx, #[[1]] == Min[xx[[All, 1]]] &, 1]]@pairs

I am asking Select to return just the first element for which the select criterion is true (hence the third argument)

Edit

Another possibility:

min = Min[pairs[[All, 1]]];
pairs /. {___, {min, x_}, ___} :> {min, x}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! See my question for the results. –  mmorris Jan 7 '12 at 3:48
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