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I'm trying to make a simple network client. The client should be able to write into a queue (buffer) and a second thread should take this buffer and write it to the server.

I tried it with java.nio and created a Thread with a static ByteBuffer. This ByteBuffer is being used in the while(true) of the Thread for writing into the channel.

In my main loop at some point I'm putting some Bytes into the static buffer via the put() Method.

In the debug mode I suspended the channel-writing-thread and then I filled the buffer via my main program loop (just pushed 'A' to write into the buffer).

After three or four button pushes I started the channel-writing-thread again and it worked just fine.

But when I try the program just normal I'm getting a buffer overflow error in the main-loop-thread. I believe my program is trying to put data into the buffer while the buffer is accessed by my channel-writing-thread. I tried to use the synchronized keyword around both parts in both threads, but that didn't help.

Main loop:

[...]
  if(Gdx.app.getInput().isKeyPressed(Input.Keys.A) && (now.getTime() - lastPush.getTime()) > 1000 )
      { 
          lastPush = now;
          //synchronized (PacketReader.writeBuffer) 
          //{
              PacketReader.writeBuffer.put(("KeKe").getBytes());
          //}
}
[...]

My Thread named "PacketReader" (well it's actually reading and writing):

class PacketReader implements Runnable
{
public static ByteBuffer writeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
[...]
public void run()
{
    while (true) {
[...]
        if (selKey.isValid() && selKey.isWritable()) 
        {
            SocketChannel sChannel = (SocketChannel)selKey.channel();

            //synchronized (PacketReader.writeBuffer) 
            //{
                if(PacketReader.writeBuffer.hasRemaining())
                {
                    PacketReader.writeBuffer.flip();
                    int numBytesWritten = sChannel.write(PacketReader.writeBuffer);
                    PacketReader.writeBuffer.flip();
                }
            //}
        }
[...]

Any idea how to create such a buffered write system? I think it's a common problem, but I don't know what to search. All NIO tutorials seem to think that the buffer is filled within the channel loop.

In the end I'm trying to have a program, which has the network component started once and within my program I just wanted to use some static send method to send packets without thinking about the queue handling or waiting for the queue.

Is there maybe somewhere a tutorial? Most games should use a similar concept, but I couldn't find any opensource simple java games with a NIO implementation (I'll use it for android so I'm trying it without a framework)

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3 Answers 3

You might try keeping a queue (say, ConcurrentLinkedQueue) of buffers to write, instead of putting into the same buffer you are sending out to the channel.

To enqueue something to be sent:

ByteBuffer buff = /* get buffer to write in */;
buff.put("KeKe".getBytes());
queue.add(buff);

Then in your select loop, when the channel is writable:

for(ByteBuffer buff = queue.poll(); buff != null; buff = queue.poll()) {
   sChannel.write(buff);
   /* maybe recycle buff */
}

You may also need to set/remove write interest on the channel depending on whether the queue is empty or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Russel :) I used your example for my application. I'm still having some questions regarding your solution: Wouldn't that mean that I'm creating a lot of Buffers (for each packet-sending?)? Could that lead to ressource problems on Android devices? Alternatively I've been thinking about putting byte[] Arrays into the queue and create the byte Arrays via ByteArrayOutputStream. So the question here is: ByteArrayOutputStream vs ByteBuffer, whats the best for Android devices? –  Thom- Jan 10 '12 at 15:10

Not a direct answer to your question, but you should consider using an existing NIO framework to make this easier. Netty and Grizzly are popular examples. I would personnally use Netty instead of writing my own server from scratch using NIO.

You could probably also look at how Netty handles reading / writing to the buffers since I assume that they have optimized their implementation.

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Thank you for the suggestion. I've been thinking about lightwight frameworks like Kryonet or Pyronet, but as I'm using this on Android I thought a direct programming would be better for the performance. On the other hand I wanted to learn NIO, so why not torture myself? :D –  Thom- Jan 10 '12 at 14:55

The whole point of NIO is that you don't need separate threads. The thread doing the filling should also do the writing.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I don't understand that completely. I'm making this for a little Android game - according to you I should do the whole filling and writing stuff in the render thread? Just before the graphics and logic part? But what if the sending or reading from the socket takes a lot of time? I would have to wait with the rendering, therefore the game would become slow... And what if my rendering takes too long, wouldn't my reading buffer have the risk to overflow? Or worse, would I loose pakets? –  Thom- Jan 10 '12 at 14:53
    
@Thom- I didn't say anything about the render thread. –  EJP Feb 4 '12 at 9:13

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