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Given the following code:

public class Product 
{
    public Guid Id {get;set;}
}

public static class Products
{
    public static Guid ProductWithSpecialProcessing = new Guid ("12345...");
}

...
public void ProcessOrder(IEnumerable<Product> products)
{
    foreach(var product in product)
    {
        if(product.Id == Products.ProductWithSpecialProcessing)
            DoSpecialProcessing();

        DoSomeStuff(product);
    }
}

Is there a better way to identify the special product without having to hard code the ID in code, an app.config file or by having some normalized database structure that identifies "special products" (there are more than 1 "special processing rules" and they are different for different products), for example:

CREATE TABLE SpecialProcessing (ProductWithSpecialProcessing uniqueidentifier)
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Polymorphism, perhaps? –  Austin Salonen Jan 6 '12 at 22:53
    
@AustinSalonen Yeah, I could inherit Product and have SpecializeProduct, but without normalizing the database further, I would be in the same situation (how do I identify which products are specialize products). –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 22:56
    
What is it about these products that determines if they need special processing? You could add the relevant property(ies) to the Product (if they're part of your data already), and then use those to determine if the special processing should occur. –  Evan M Jan 6 '12 at 22:59
    
@EvanM The problem is that products are all defined as Product so by adding special properties to Product I just end up polluting the model. Polymorphism is obviously the correct answer, but I wanted to solicit any other possibilities I haven't thought of. –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 23:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would go the inheritance route.

The first step would be to create your SpecialProduct ancestors of Product, with some way of linking them to your database records. Possibilities include a mapping table in the database or the class could define its own mapping.

Then your data-access layer would have a factory that would return a set of Products created by the mapping you defined above.

The rest of your application works with these Products without actually caring when they are "special" or not.

Something like this...

class Product {}

[MapTo("<GUID>"]  //your attribute...
class SpecialA : Product { }

class ProductFactory
{
    private Dictionary<Guid, Type> _productMap = ...;

    public ProductFactory() 
    {
        //Initialize map to types that are Products AND have a MapTo attribute
    }

    public Product[] GetBy(...criteria...) 
    {
        // dynamically instantiate Products
        // if the Guid exists in map, use that type
        // otherwise, use Product
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The only reason I can't take this approach is a two week deadline and the huge amount of refactoring it would require. Any other suggestions? –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 23:06
    
@scottm: How many specialize products are you working with? –  Austin Salonen Jan 6 '12 at 23:13
    
Currently, about 30, but that number will keep increasing in the next months (which will probably lead to investing the refactor time). –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 23:17
    
I like the code sample you posted. That would allow me to refactor smaller parts at a time, and eventually move everything into the database. –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 23:20
    
@scottm: I would push back for time so you can do it right the first time (or, I suppose, this time) but you know your organizational politics better than me. Paying off technical debt now is cheaper than paying it two weeks/months/years from now. –  Austin Salonen Jan 6 '12 at 23:21
public class Product 
{
    public Guid Id {get;set;}

    public virtual void DoStuff() {}
}

public class ProductWithSpecialProcessing : Product
{
    public override void DoStuff() {}
}

public void ProcessOrder(IEnumerable<Product> products)
{
    foreach(var product in products)
    {
        product.DoStuff();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
See the comment I posted to the question. –  scottm Jan 6 '12 at 22:59

You could define an enum for the different processing types

[Flags] // this allows you to define multiple special
        // processing types for each product
public enum Processing
{
    None = 0,
    Special1,
    Special2,
    // ...
}

and store it as an int in the Product table in your database.

Then you could do your further processing depending on that value.

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