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I'm developing a simple iPhone app where users register, and sign in with their email/password. These values are stored in a remote database.

I'm using Cloudant to store this information (CouchDB is great), and have granted read-only privileges to a new user (created API key/pass). In order to communicate with Cloudant, you obviously need a URL to access it (eg https://user:pass@db.cloudant.com), which is stored in the app as a string.

Now, while I know this is pretty unsafe, I can't think of any other alternatives in order to keep the db URL safe (specifically the username/password for it). I've seen people talk about using another server to proxy through to obtain the credentials, but it seems a little awkward.

Any help or thoughts would be really appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

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Are you trying to make a connection from your iPhone app directly to the database? You shouldn't give your app read access to the whole remote user table / database. Sooner or later someone would find out and would have read access to your data. No matter how you try to obfuscate it, the user/password combination would need to be stored somehow in your app.

What you should do is build a web service that connects to your DB and verifies your users. The database password stays on a server. This proxy-approach is not awkward, it is the only way to keep your database logins away from your users.

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That's what I thought would be the case. I meant awkward in terms of adding another layer (another server) that has the web service on. But if that's the way it has to be (and the way others do the same thing), then that's fine! I was more after the best-practice approach, cheers! –  crawf Jan 7 '12 at 0:08
    
Yep, best-practice in this is case is to abstract the storage (the database). The web service would only answer "user/pass combination ok" or "invalid login" to your application. In this regard it is not really a proxy, think of it as a server function which you can access with HTTP ;) –  shapecatcher Jan 7 '12 at 0:36
    
Sounds good! Although the URL of the web service would still be inside the app, and the users credentials would be sent via POST. It's better than having direct access to the database. Thanks for your insight! –  crawf Jan 7 '12 at 0:44
    
@crawf I'm new to web development, so, we should create a web app that we would call from out app. The web app would require authentication and then upon successful login, the web app would access the database and return the requested info. We would need to put the user/pass in the app to call the web app. How would that be any different from just having the database credentials in the main app? Let me know if I am missing something. –  Jason Crosby Mar 14 at 14:18

One option is to create your own service in the cloud that abstracts away your storage. That also has the benefit of allowing you to change your storage without updating all your devices.

In that model, the service stores the credentials to access the storage and you implement user security in your application layer. I also wouldn't think of it as a proxy layer - that implies that it's a thin pass through. If you develop a service, you should define a web interface (rest, soap) that's agnostic to the storage. In that case, it's a service, not a proxy.

EDIT:

Typically the web service authenticates the user (don't write your own). Basic Auth with SSL is typical. Then, in that services context API, you get access to the username. From there, you do you what you need. Your storage is accessed with the one storage account that has full access to all content.

Another auth option is OAuth which allows them to authenticate with someone like google - you never get the password - just a token from google letting you know they authenticated and they are who they claim to be. For example, that's how stack overflow works.

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So, if I've got this right...For a typical user login, the'll input their email/password, which is sent to a server that's setup with the service. From there, it'll communicate with CloudAnt to verify their login info, which will return the request to the service, which in turn will return to the app. Still, this means that the cloud service URL will need to be stored in the app. What's to stop someone from accessing that URL directly? –  crawf Jan 7 '12 at 0:14
    
Typically the web service authenticates the user (don't write your own). Basic Auth with SSL is typical. Then, in that services context API, you get access to the username. From there, you do you what you need. Your storage is accessed with the one storage account that has full access to all content. –  bryanmac Jan 7 '12 at 12:46
    
Another auth option is OAuth which allows them to authenticate with someone like google - you never get the password - just a token from google letting you know they authenticated and they are who they claim to be. For example, that's how stack overflow works. –  bryanmac Jan 7 '12 at 12:48
    
Good advice! I've been looking at link which has some good ideas. I've written a proof of concept following the posts guide, but would it be better to use Google or Amazon for authentication? I've heard lots about OAuth (primarily from Twitter), so should probably go with that I think. Sorry for my ignorance! –  crawf Jan 8 '12 at 21:08

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