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I've seen many questions like this but none of them seem to have position:absolute in it (maybe that's the problem, not sure) Always used to work with tables and now in my first attempt with div's I've encountered the following issue.

My main problem is that when one of my child-divs expands (#contentBox) then the main-div (#container) isn't expanding aswell.

If you have a look at http://www.xact.be/consciente/index_v1.html all is well, once the div expands over the min-height of the #container-div it al goes haywire, see http://www.xact.be/consciente/index_v2.html for the issue.

Not sure if i'm coding this all wrong or not, hence why i'm asking for your expertise :)

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2  
You're using position:absolute all over the place, it's better to use a more fluid layout and let browser adjust the elements. –  rogelware Jan 7 '12 at 2:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should only use position: absolute in rare cases. Absolute positioning a Div removes it from the normal flow of a page and disrupts the normal parent/child relationship. Instead position: relative the div and float: right. Then add the appropriate margin. You will also need to remove unnecessary absolute positioning from parent divs. Position the divs using float, padding and margin only. Absolute positioning is best used for things outside of the normal flow.

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There is nothing wrong with using absolute positioning when and where needed, such as within a relatively positioned element where floating may not do the job. –  Rob Jan 7 '12 at 2:25
2  
I agree, but in this case he does not need to use absolute positioning. –  Nicole McCoy Jan 7 '12 at 2:29
    
That's indeed better! Thx for the help :) took me a long time to change from tables to divs but it's worth the time to learn –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 7 '12 at 2:30
    
no problem, It takes a little getting used to css but it's much more fluid than tables, which is why manhandling divs through position: absolute is best left to "have to" situations. Glad you're getting the hang of it. –  Nicole McCoy Jan 7 '12 at 2:32

You have added the position element to a lot of things that do not truly need it. This might be helping you in a visual editor, but if you remove those attributes and go live you will see they work where they need to.

It important to remember in HTML that you don't need to reference or give values to attributes unless you NEED to make a modification.

After reviewing your code it seems you have not used the min-height value correctly. Removing it and assigning automatic height will allow it adjust freely to the content you were trying to add.

This is what you have:

#contentBox {
position:relative;
float:right;
width: 575px;
min-height: 500px;
padding: 20px;
text-align: left;
color: #333333;
background-color: #fff;
background-attachment: fixed;
background-image: url(images/logo_box.png);
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-position: bottom right;
}

I suggest...

Remove min-height: 500px; & position: relative;

replace with height: auto;

OR Increase value min-height manually:500px+

#contentBox {
 height: auto;
 float:right;
 width: 575px;
 padding: 20px;
 text-align: left;
 color: #333333;
 background-color: #fff;
 background-attachment: fixed;
 background-image: url(images/logo_box.png);
 background-repeat: no-repeat;
 background-position: bottom right;
}

(Remove those position attributes, you can trust you margins and padding, IF it does break then look to adjust certain elements indefinitely.

Hope this helps!

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Thanks for the advice, the min-height i've used for the content-box was because it really has to be that big even if no content is in that box, with the settings you suggest it doesn't do that :-) –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 7 '12 at 14:33
    
Depends on how you interpret it. I did mention you could adjust your minimum height. Since you are using different pages and you are placing your css inside each page, this give you 1 level deeper of control...Thus you can specify on pages with less content it remain "min-height: 500px;" and increase/remove that value on pages with more :D –  user1132490 Jan 7 '12 at 17:27
    
I feel compelled to suggest to you to move to HTML5 & CSS3. Ive been in web for 7 years and this is where most of us are these days. Just know this is where you want to be! (i could talk for hours about why that is and isn't true....) –  user1132490 Jan 7 '12 at 17:30
    
This is only the design for a php driven site, so all will go in a css-file. i'd like to move to html5 & css3, but not really sure if it's a good step to take as I'm not sure all browsers are supported and such. Got any pointers where to start with that? –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 7 '12 at 21:25
1  
Getting nicely along with this tutorial from nettuts! To bad it keeps me up to late :P If you have any pointers on what i've done so far, do tell :) –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 9 '12 at 0:37
#container{
position:relative;
}

This will solve it!!

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when i add that it gives me scrollbars inside the div, it's an improvement but i'd rather have that the #container-div also expands :) (probably my mistake for having overflow in there) –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 7 '12 at 2:18
    
@YoeriRousseaux - The reason for the scrollbars is because you have a min-height that is smaller than the browser window. –  Rob Jan 7 '12 at 2:22
    
Oh ok, having a go at it now with relative positioning, not 100% how it should be atm, but coming there. Appreciate the help! –  Yoeri Rousseaux Jan 7 '12 at 2:32

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