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hopefully there is a simple resolution to my challenge.

I have a parent table I will call table 'A' and a child table called table 'B'. I would like to get information from the most recent row in table 'B' for a given row in table 'A'.

For example... parent 12345 in Table 'A' has three child rows in table 'B'. Row number 3 is the most recent row in table 'B' for parent 12345. I would like to get row 3's information.

I tried quite a few different approaches and could not get it to do what is needed, hence my posting this here.

Thank you in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use an INNER JOIN on the two tables, relating them by the child id to the parent's child id:

SELECT b.*
FROM Table_B b INNER JOIN Table_A a
ON b.id = a.Table_B_id 
WHERE a.id = 42
ORDER BY b.id DESC
LIMIT 1

I was going to suggest:

SELECT * FROM Table_B WHERE id IN (
    SELECT Table_B_id FROM Table_A ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1
)

But apparently MySQL doesn't support LIMIT on an inner select.

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Thanks for your help Jonathan. –  Thomas Grady CBIP Jan 8 '12 at 14:14

If you are doing this for one record at a time, I'd use @JonathonReinhart's answer.

If you want this to work for multiple records in table A then I'd use a join on to a sub query...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  (SELECT parent_id, MAX(child_id) AS child_id FROM TableB GROUP BY parent_id) AS lookup
INNER JOIN
  TableB
    ON  TableB.parent_id = lookup.parent_id
    AND TableB.child_id  = lookup.child_id


This assumes that your child_id values are in the order you want. This may not be true, and you need to use another field to determine the "latest" record. Provided that this field is unique for each parent, the same idea still works.

SELECT
  *
FROM
  (SELECT parent_id, MAX(date_stamp) AS date_stamp FROM TableB GROUP BY parent_id) AS lookup
INNER JOIN
  TableB
    ON  TableB.parent_id  = lookup.parent_id
    AND TableB.date_stamp = lookup.date_stamp

Where the child_id is not in the order you want, and the ordering field is not unique, this can give multiple records instead of 1. For example, two children with identical date_stamp values. This can be resolved with a correlated sub-query, though that is slower...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  TableA
INNER JOIN
  TableB
    ON  TableB.parent_id = TableA.parent_id
    AND TableB.child_id  =
        (
          SELECT
            child_id
          FROM
            TableB
          WHERE
            parent_id = TableA.parent_id       -- This makes it correlated
          ORDER BY
            date_stamp DESC,
            child_id   DESC
          LIMIT
            1
        )
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Thanks for your help Dems. –  Thomas Grady CBIP Jan 8 '12 at 14:16

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