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I have a function which I want to take, as a parameter, a 2d array of variable size.

So far I have this:

void myFunction(double** myArray){
     myArray[x][y] = 5;
     etc...
}

And I have declared an array elsewhere in my code:

double anArray[10][10];

However, calling myFunction(anArray) gives me an error.

I do not want to copy the array when I pass it in. Any changes made in myFunction should alter the state of anArray. If I understand correctly, I only want to pass in as an argument a pointer to a 2D array. The function needs to accept arrays of different sizes also. So for example [10][10] and [5][5] How can I do this?

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1  
what error do you get? –  Chethan Ravindranath Jan 7 '12 at 3:42
    
cannot convert parameter 3 from 'double [10][10]' to 'double **' –  RogerDarwin Jan 7 '12 at 3:43
    
declaring anArray as "double *anArray[10]" will compile it fine, but as far as I know a[10][10] and *a[10] should be the same. I don't know the subtle differences between the two. :( –  Chethan Ravindranath Jan 7 '12 at 3:47
    
    
The accepted answer shows only 2 techniques [its (2) and (3) are the same] but there're 4 unique ways of passing a 2D array to a function. –  legends2k Mar 24 at 11:44
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6 Answers

up vote 97 down vote accepted

There are three ways to pass a 2D array to a function:

1, The parameter is a 2D array

int array[10][10];
void passFunc(int a[][10])
{
    // ...
}
passFunc(array);

2, The parameter is an array containing pointers

int *array[10];
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    array[i] = new int[10];
void passFunc(int *a[10]) //array containing pointers
{
    // ...
}
passFunc(array); 

3, The parameter is a pointer to a pointer

int **array;
array = new int *[10];
for(int i = 0; i <10; i++)
    array[i] = new int[10];
void passFunc(int **a)
{
    // ...
}
passFunc(array); 
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All good answers, Thank you. I have chosen this one as I believe I am looking for example 3) shown here –  RogerDarwin Jan 7 '12 at 4:06
    
Can I ask if in the third example, for the array (aka matrix) is also available the notation array[i][j]? –  Overflowh May 26 '13 at 10:39
3  
@Overflowh You can get the elements of array with array[i][j] :) –  shengy May 27 '13 at 3:15
1  
For the 1st case, the parameter can be declared as int (*a)[10]. –  Zachary Jun 13 '13 at 14:38
2  
For the 2nd case, the parameter can be declared as int **. –  Zachary Jun 14 '13 at 3:14
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A modification to shengy's first suggestion, you can use templates to make the function accept a multi-dimensional array variable (instead of storing an array of pointers that have to be managed and deleted):

template <size_t size_y>
void func(double arr[][size_y])
{
    printf("%X\n", arr);
}

int main()
{
    double a1[10][10];
    double a2[5][5];

    printf("%X\n%X\n\n", &a1, &a2);
    func(a1);
    func(a2);

    return 0;
}

The print statements are there to show that the arrays are getting passed by reference (by displaying the variables' addresses)

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You should use %p for printing a pointer, and even then, you must cast it to void *, else printf() invokes undefined behavior. Furthermore, you should not use the addressof (&) operator when calling the functions, since the functions expect an argument of type double (*)[size_y], whereas you currently pass them double (*)[10][10] and double (*)[5][5]. –  user529758 Oct 20 '13 at 8:26
    
If you're using templates making both dimensions as template arguments is more appropriate and is better since low-level pointer access may be completely avoided. –  legends2k Mar 24 at 12:43
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You can create a function template like this:

template<int R, int C>
void myFunction(double (&myArray)[R][C])
{
    myArray[x][y] = 5;
    etc...
}

Then you have both dimension sizes via R and C. A different function will be created for each array size, so if your function is large and you call it with a variety of different array sizes, this may be costly. You could use it as a wrapper over a function like this though:

void myFunction(double * arr, int R, int C)
{
    arr[x * C + y] = 5;
    etc...
}

It treats the array as one dimensional, and uses arithmetic to figure out the offsets of the indexes. In this case, you would define the template like this:

template<int C, int R>
void myFunction(double (&myArray)[R][C])
{
    myFunction(*myArray, R, C);
}
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size_t is the better type for array indexes than int. –  Andrew Tomazos Jul 10 '13 at 11:42
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Fixed Size

1. Pass by reference

template <size_t rows, size_t cols>
void process_2d_array_template(int (&array)[rows][cols])
{
    std::cout << __func__ << std::endl;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << i << ": ";
        for (size_t j = 0; j < cols; ++j)
            std::cout << array[i][j] << '\t';
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

In C++ passing the array by reference without losing the dimension information is probably the safest, since one needn't worry about the caller passing an incorrect dimension (compiler flags when mismatching). However, this isn't possible with dynamic (heap-living) arrays; it works for automatic (stack-living) arrays only i.e. the dimensionality should be known at compile time.

2. Pass by pointer

void process_2d_array_pointer(int (*array)[5][10])
{
    std::cout << __func__ << std::endl;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << i << ": ";
        for (size_t j = 0; j < 10; ++j)
            std::cout << (*array)[i][j] << '\t';
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }    
}

The C equivalent of the previous method is passing the array by pointer. This should not be confused with passing by the array's decayed pointer type (3), which is the common, popular method, albeit less safe than this one but more flexible. Like (1), use this method when all the dimensions of the array is fixed and known at compile-time. Note that when calling the function the array's address should be passed process_2d_array_pointer(&a) and not the address of the first element by decay process_2d_array_pointer(a).

Varied Size

These are inherited from C but are less safe, the compiler has no way of checking, guaranteeing that the caller is passing the required dimensions. The function only banks on what the caller passes in as the dimension(s). These are more flexible than the above ones since arrays of different lengths can be passed to them invariably.

It is to be remembered that there's no such thing as passing an array directly to a function in C [while in C++ they can be passed as a reference (1)]; (2) is passing a pointer to the array and not the array itself. Always passing an array as-is becomes a pointer-copy operation which is facilitated by array's nature of decaying into a pointer.

3. Pass by (value) a pointer to the decayed type

// int array[][10] is just fancy notation for the same thing
void process_2d_array(int (*array)[10], size_t rows)
{
    std::cout << __func__ << std::endl;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << i << ": ";
        for (size_t j = 0; j < 10; ++j)
            std::cout << array[i][j] << '\t';
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

Although int array[][10] is allowed, I'd not recommend it over the above syntax since the above syntax makes it clear that the identifier array is a single pointer to an array of 10 integers, while this syntax looks like it's a 2D array but is the same pointer to an array of 10 integers. Here we know the number of elements in a single row (i.e. the column size, 10 here) but the number of rows is unknown and hence to be passed as an argument. In this case there's some safety since the compiler can flag when a pointer to an array with second dimension not equal to 10 is passed. The first dimension is the varying part and can be omitted. See here for the rationale on why only the first dimension is allowed to be omitted.

4. Pass by pointer to a pointer

// int *array[10] is just fancy notation for the same thing
void process_pointer_2_pointer(int **array, size_t rows, size_t cols)
{
    std::cout << __func__ << std::endl;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << i << ": ";
        for (size_t j = 0; j < cols; ++j)
            std::cout << array[i][j] << '\t';
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

Again there's an alternative syntax of int *array[10] which is the same as int **array. In this syntax the [10] is ignored as it decays into a pointer thereby becoming int **array. Perhaps it is just a cue to the caller that the passed array should have at least 10 columns, even then row count is required. In any case the compiler doesn't flag for any length/size violations (it only checks if the type passed is a pointer to pointer), hence requiring both row and column counts as parameter makes sense here.

Note: (4) is the least safest option since it hardly has any type check and the most inconvenient. One cannot legitimately pass a 2D array to this function; C-FAQ condemns the usual workaround of doing int x[5][10]; process_pointer_2_pointer((int**)&x[0][0], 5, 10); as it may potentially lead to undefined behaviour due to array flattening. The right way of passing an array in this method brings us to the inconvenient part i.e. we need an additional (surrogate) array of pointers with each of its element pointing to the respective row of the actual, to-be-passed array; this surrogate is then passed to the function (see below); all this for getting the same job done as the above methods which are more safer, cleaner and perhaps faster.

Here's a driver program to test the above functions:

#include <iostream>

// copy above functions here

int main()
{
    int a[5][10] = { { } };
    process_2d_array_template(a);
    process_2d_array_pointer(&a);    // <-- notice the unusual usage of addressof (&) operator on an array
    process_2d_array(a, 5);
    // works since a's first dimension decays into a pointer thereby becoming int (*)[10]

    int *b[5];  // surrogate
    for (size_t i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
    {
        b[i] = a[i];
    }
    process_pointer_2_pointer(b, 5, 10);
    // process_2d_array(b, 5);
    // doesn't work since b's first dimension decays into a pointer thereby becoming int**
}
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Single dimensional array decays to a pointer pointer pointing to the first element in the array. While a 2D array decays to a pointer pointing to first row. So, the function prototype should be -

void myFunction(double (*myArray) [10]);

I would prefer std::vector over raw arrays.

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anArray[10][10] is not a pointer to a pointer, it is a contiguous chunk of memory suitable for storing 100 values of type double, which compiler knows how to address because you specified the dimensions. You need to pass it to a function as an array. You can omit the size of the initial dimension, as follows:

void f(double p[][10]) {
}

However, this will not let you pass arrays with the last dimension other than ten.

The best solution in C++ is to use std::vector<std::vector<double> >: it is nearly as efficient, and significantly more convenient.

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I prefer this solution as the std library is very efficient - by the way I like dasblinkenlight; I used to use dasblikenlicht –  mozillanerd Jan 18 '12 at 21:34
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