Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So in my Android app, I've been testing how to detect an incoming and outgoing call. I got it to work by building a class that extends a BroadcastReceiver, but in that class if I call another class it crashes. For example MyClass mc = new MyClass(); mc.functionname();

My actual app is running a looping sound clip. I want to pause that sound clip when an incoming or outgoing call is made. The soundclip is played in a class that extends Activity. How do I do this?

This is what I have for the BroadcastReceiver class and my manifest.

package com.anthony.phone;

import android.content.BroadcastReceiver;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.media.AudioManager;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.telephony.TelephonyManager;
import android.util.Log;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class inComingReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {

    @Override
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        Bundle bundle = intent.getExtras();

        if(null == bundle)
                return;

        Log.i("MYTAG",bundle.toString());

        String state = bundle.getString(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_STATE);

        Log.i("MYTAG","State: "+ state);

        if(state.equalsIgnoreCase(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_STATE_RINGING))
        {
                String phonenumber = bundle.getString(TelephonyManager.EXTRA_INCOMING_NUMBER);

                Log.i("MYTAG",":) Incomng Number: " + phonenumber);

                String info = "Detect Calls sample application\nIncoming number: " + phonenumber;

                Toast.makeText(context, info, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();

    }

}
}

and my manifest

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest package="com.anthony.phone"
    android:versionCode="1"
    android:versionName="1.0" xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="10" />
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.READ_PHONE_STATE"/>
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.PROCESS_OUTGOING_CALLS"/>

    <application
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name" >
        <activity
            android:name=".CallTActivity"
            android:label="@string/app_name" >
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>
        <receiver android:name="com.anthony.phone.inComingReceiver">
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.PHONE_STATE"/>
            </intent-filter>
        </receiver>


    </application>

</manifest>
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

i had also this kind of problem. i solved by calling activity from broadcast receiver And writing my class code in particular Activity. As mentioned below

            Intent i = new Intent(context,newActivity.class);  
            i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);  
            context.startActivity(i);  

i hope it will help you to solve your query. ask me if you further have any doubt.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I thought of this too, but what if my main class is already running the sound. Wouldn't this just run a new activity or will it just send the 'flag' to the running activity that I want? –  Anthony Honciano Jan 7 '12 at 5:37
    
yes you can call your running activity from this and by flag you can send a flag using put Extra like below code –  Harsh Trivedi Jan 7 '12 at 5:49
    
Intent i = new Intent(context, yourActivity.class); i.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK).putExtra(name, value); context.startActivity(i); –  Harsh Trivedi Jan 7 '12 at 5:51
    
With the help of put extra you can identify that this call is made from broadcast receiver. so that you can stop your sound clip –  Harsh Trivedi Jan 7 '12 at 5:52
1  
Excellent! Thank you! –  Anthony Honciano Jan 7 '12 at 5:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.