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I finally finished a home-grown version of quicksort to sort an array of structures by a char string member. The reason I'm not using the stdlib qsort is that it takes over 5 minutes on a super fast machine.

I have 12 physical and 24 logical cores (dual xeon 5690's), and 192 GB (yes, GB, not MB) of ram, so I thought I could use that by writing a multi-threaded version of quicksort. But I'm getting a stack overflow exception, presumably because of the struct s_stream that is created on the stack with each recursion. I have over 2,400,000 strings to sort, so I can only imagine how deep the recursion must be (if deep is the correct term).

I can't really make the structure smaller. Should I just abandon this and look for another sorting algo? If so, which one?

struct s_stream {

    char name[100];
    int avg;
    int current;
    int currentY;
    int marrayIndex;

    int xy[2500];
    int zz[2500];

}

    void quickSort(struct s_stream items[], int left, int right)
    {
      int i, j;
      struct s_stream temp;

      i = left;
      j = right;
      temp = items[(left+right)/2];

      do {
            while((strcmp(items[i].name, temp.name) < 0) && (i < right)) { i++; }
            while((strcmp(items[j].name, temp.name) > 0) && (j > left)) {  j--; }
        if(i <= j)
        {
            temp = items[i];
            items[i] = items[j];
            items[j] = temp;

            i++;
            j--;
        }
  } while(i <= j);


    #pragma omp parallel sections
    {
        #pragma omp section
        if(left < j) { quickSort(items, left, j);}

        #pragma omp section
        if(i < right) { quickSort(items, i, right); }
     }
}
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1  
Compile with a larger stack. You've plenty of memory. –  Jason Coco Jan 7 '12 at 8:21
    
You could try and increase the size of the stack your program uses, to overcome the stack overflow error. –  darnir Jan 7 '12 at 8:25
1  
As a side note, consider using merge sort. As quick sort, it's easy to implement in a multi-threaded way and more importantly it has a better pessimistic time complexity of O(n log n), unlike quick sort's O(n²). –  Jan Jan 7 '12 at 8:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This sort of massive parallelism isn't very beneficial. The extra overhead of scheduling starts to outweigh the benefit of more threads. Few gains are seen by increasing the number of threads past the number of physical cores.

As Basile mentioned, you might consider instead using stdlib's qsort on each 12th of the array in parallel, then mergesorting the chunks together.

The thing that's likely killing your performance is the size of your structs. 20K is large enough that you're destroying your locality of reference, and on modern processors, where the cache is important, that's deadly for performance. Changing xy and zz to be dynamically allocated could represent a huge performance gain, as could sorting an array of pointers.

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Sorting algorithms are O(n log n) at their best (and cannot be better!).

You could sort pointers to items, not the items themselves. This should probably solve the stack overflow issue and probably go faster (not huge amount of data per item).

There are many many books on sorting. Read the famous Knuth algorithmics books, and read some other good agorithmic book. There are also parallel algorithms for sort (I don't know them well, but there is a considerable literature). Sorting is probably still a research subject, and they are conferences and PhD on it.

You could for your example, to speed up a little, slice your array into smaller chunks, sort each chunk in parallel in a separate thread, and use mergesort to merge the sorted partial results.

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2  
Only those sorting alogithms based on comparison are O(nlogn) at their best. Algorithms like bucket sort can be O(n + r) where r is the range of numbers to be sorted. –  qiao Jan 7 '12 at 8:38
    
Yes. But I said "at their best". Bucketsort is O(N^2) worst case. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 7 '12 at 8:46

It seems you are running out of stack. One way to solve you problem could be to increase the stack, I think you should check your compiler manual on how to do this.

Another way is to implement this without recursion, here is an example implementation http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/QuickSortWithoutRecursion.aspx

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One possibility of how to reduce stack consumption is to change the s_stream structure into:

struct s_stream {
    char name[100];
    int avg;
    int current;
    int currentY;
    int marrayIndex;

    // Instead of int xy[2500]
    int *xy;  // Allocated via malloc()
    int *zz;  // Allocated via malloc()
}

Another option would be to replace the line

struct s_stream temp;

with

struct s_stream *temp = malloc(sizeof(s_stream));

and execute free(temp); on exit from the quickSort function.

The stack consumption in an implementation of quicksort depends on the choice of the pivot. So another option of how to make the stack less deeper is to use a better algorithm for pivot selection.

After the quicksort function is done with the do { ... } while(i <= j); loop, it may be possible to update i and j as long as items[i].name equals to items[j].name. This may be useful in case the value of (j-left) differs too much from the value of (right-i).

If it is probable for the strings being sorted to have long common prefixes, it may be possible to improve the performance of string comparisons by preprocessing the strings before sorting them.

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I thought about the malloc/free approach, but assumed that, since this would be done with every recursion, it would take forever. Could I achieve the same result with a single calloc call per thread? –  user994179 Jan 7 '12 at 8:42
    
As suggested by Basile Starynkevitch, you could sort pointers to items, not the items themselves - this approach doesn't require malloc/free because the size of a pointer is just 4 or 8 bytes, so you can allocate it on the stack. On the other hand, if for some reason the 'temp' variable has to be a copy of an item, and malloc takes long time, you can use an allocation pool. In any case, I would suggest you first benchmark the code in order to see where it is spending the most time (if you are using Linux, use "valgrind --tool=callgrind ./program" and then use kcachegrind). –  Atom Jan 7 '12 at 9:20

don't use recursion, go for a decent iterative version of your algorithm. You can always transform a recursive algorithm in an iterative one. Don't try to early-optimize you code ("that's root to evil" as Knuth says :-)), First let's try a vanilla quick sort.

More important: sort pointers to data, not the actual data!!!!

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