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My input file contains a transaction on each line. The following example shows the structure of my input file:

a
a
a,b
b
a,b
a,c
c
c

The above input file has 11 items and 8 itemsets. This input file has 3 unique items and 5 unique itemsets. I would like to compute the frequencies of each unique itemset. For the above input file, I'd like to write an R script that generates an output similar to the following CSV file:

"a",0.25
"a,b",0.25
"c",0.25
"b",0.125
"a,c",0.125

The report presents the number of occurrences of each unique itemset in the input transactions file divided by the total number of item sets in the input. Note that the report has sorted the itemsets based on their frequencies. How can I use R to compute the frequencies of the itemsets in my input transactions file?

UPDATE: I've already computed the association rules using the read.transactions and apriori methods. Can I reuse the results of these methods to compute the frequencies of the input itemsets.

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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Jan 7 '12 at 9:09

This question came from our site for people interested in statistics, machine learning, data analysis, data mining, and data visualization.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As simple as this:

Data <- read.table(header=TRUE, text="
itemset
a
a
a,b
b
a,b
a,c
c
c")

cbind(table(Data), table(Data) / nrow(Data))

## EDIT: Include sorting by observed proportion
T <- table(Data)                        # observed freq.
T <- cbind(T, T/nrow(Data))             # combine freq. and prop.
T <- T[order(T[,2], decreasing=TRUE),]  # sort
colnames(T) <- c("freq", "prop")        # add column names
share|improve this answer
    
This piece of code doesn't sort by frequencies. – reprogrammer Jan 7 '12 at 19:53
    
@reprogrammer I apologize. Updated. – Jason Morgan Jan 7 '12 at 23:35
    
Can anyone help me, why I get the error when i try to execute the first line of code? Error in read.table(header = TRUE, text = "\nitemset\na\na\na,b\nb\na,b\na,c\nc\nc") : unused argument(s) (text = "\nitemset\na\na\na,b\nb\na,b\na,c\nc\nc") – moldovean Mar 17 '12 at 22:52
    
@moldovean Are you attempting to enter the data in a single line? – Jason Morgan Mar 18 '12 at 1:02
    
@JasonMorgan Well.. I just copy/pasted, I thought it would work. But it gives me an error. : unused argument(s) (text = " \nitemset \na \na \na, b\nb \na, b\na, c\nc") – moldovean Mar 18 '12 at 13:50
dat <- read.table(text="a
a
a,b
b
a,b
a,c
c
c")
prop.table(table(dat$V1))

#    a   a,b   a,c     b     c 
#0.250 0.250 0.125 0.125 0.250 
 dat.prop <- as.data.frame( prop.table(table(dat$V1)) )
 dat.prop <- dat.prop[order(dat.prop$Freq, decreasing=TRUE), ]
 dat.prop
#-------- Added the order step as a revision
  Var1  Freq
1    a 0.250
2  a,b 0.250
5    c 0.250
3  a,c 0.125
4    b 0.125
#---------

 write.table(dat.prop, file="dat.prop.csv", sep=",", header=FALSE)
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I think this method is the simplest and most straight forward. – Tyler Rinker Jan 7 '12 at 12:43
    
There is no need for prop.table(). table() works fine. See my answer below. – Jason Morgan Jan 7 '12 at 19:01
    
Well, you either need to divide by the NROW of the dataframe or use prop.table. I chose to offer prop.table because it generalizes to higher dimensions – 42- Jan 7 '12 at 21:49
    
True. While it doesn't matter for this small problem, prop.table is pretty inefficient: it calculates x/sum(x) when nrow is already available from the data.frame object. – Jason Morgan Jan 7 '12 at 23:15
    
Have you looked at the code? It is basically x/sum(x), so we are really arguing over nothing. – 42- Jan 8 '12 at 4:26

If the input data is in a file called 'dat.txt', then this code would work. The output would be in a file in the same directory called 'out.csv'.

Y=read.table('dat.txt')
Y=as.character(unlist(Y))
U=unique(Y)
n=length(U)
F=rep(0,n)
for(i in 1:n) F[i] = mean(Y==U[i])
D=cbind(U,F)
colnames(D)=c("Value","Frequency")
write.csv(D,'out.csv')

My apologies that this code is neither pretty nor commented.

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This piece of code doesn't sort by frequencies. – reprogrammer Jan 7 '12 at 19:55

Another solution using plyr

library(plyr)
ddply(dat, "V1", summarize, Freq = length(V1)/NROW(dat))

   V1  Freq
1   a 0.250
2 a,b 0.250
3 a,c 0.125
4   b 0.125
5   c 0.250
share|improve this answer
    
This piece of code doesn't sort by frequencies. – reprogrammer Jan 7 '12 at 19:53
    
easy to fix by sorting on frequencies. – Ramnath Jan 7 '12 at 20:06
    
Would you please update your code to sort by frequencies descendingly? – reprogrammer Jan 7 '12 at 20:42

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