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I have an abstract class that I use to set default values in a WCF proxy. I want all my other proxies to derive from this class passing in the service client that was generated when they added a service reference. Therefore I have the following

public abstract class ProxyFactory<T> where T : new()
{
    protected BasicHttpBinding BasicHttpBinding = new BasicHttpBinding();

    public abstract T GetTranslationServiceClient();

    protected ProxyFactory()
    {
        BasicHttpBinding.Security.Mode = BasicHttpSecurityMode.None;
    }

    protected T CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint(string uri)
    {
        var address = new EndpointAddress(uri);
        return new T(BasicHttpBinding, address);
    }
}

So for instance if you had a project and added a service reference to WCF service called MyService you would have a generated class called MyServiceClient. Then I would create a new class called MyServiceProxy that would derive from this class where T would be of type MyServiceClient. This would allow me to have all my common configuration in done in the base and the only code I would need to write is an override for the CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint with the url of the service.

public override MyServiceImplClient GetMyServiceClient()
{
    return CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint("http://localhost/MyServices/MyServiceImpl.svc");
}

The this derived class will be used as a factory so calling clients would create a new instance and invoke CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint to get a preconfigured WCF proxy

The problem is the line return new T(BasicHttpBinding, address); in the CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint method of the abstract class. It will not allow me to pass the parameters to the constructor. How can this be done?

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1  
It may sometimes be a better option to introduce an interface with an init method –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '12 at 10:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this case you need to create your returned instance with Activator.CreateInstance:

protected T CreateClientForServiceAtEndpoint(string uri)
{
    var address = new EndpointAddress(uri);
    return (T) Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), BasicHttpBinding, address);
}

And there is no need for the where T : new() restriction.

EDIT: After Marc's comment

Because there is now why to say anything about a T's constructor (other then new()) the Activator.CreateInstance can throw if the supplied T does not have the right constructor.

But you can add some additional guide to your API users with the creation of an abstract base class:

public abstract class ServiceImplClientBase
{
    public ServiceImplClientBase(BasicHttpBinding basicHttpBinding, EndpointAddress endpointAddress)
    {
        //...
    }
}

And use it as the type restriction: where T : ServiceImplClientBase. But it can just provide a hint for the need of the constructor because derived types can declare the base constructor as private or protected.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer thankyou –  John Jan 7 '12 at 10:51
    
The second example will not work - that says nothing about the constructors of T –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '12 at 10:58

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