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My Class is independant from another Class. Inside my Class, a function is doing the same but refined job as a function in another Class. Can I use parent:: function_in_another_class() and get my function join that parent funciton's job flow?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No.

In PHP you can only extend from none or one class. As you write both classes are independent to each other, there is no information where to find the one or the other class.

But what you're looking for is probably this:

class A
{
    function myFunction() {}
}

class B
{
    private $a;
    public function __construct(A $a)
    {
        $this->a = $a;
    }
    public function myFunction()
    {
        $this->a->myFunction();
    }
}
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Thanks! This is clear enough. –  Jenny Jan 7 '12 at 11:43
    
nice one, very clear. –  Edward Nov 4 '13 at 14:19
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If any class method already doing the same thing why would you bother call join it?

You can not do it. If you want the same job flow best way to do is to instantiate the other class and invoke that very same method. Thats why we use OOP.

See the example,

interface Fable()
{
    public function f();
}

class OtherClass implements Fable
{
    public function f()
    {
      // job flow
    }
}

class MyClass
{
    private $fable;
    public function __construct(Fable $f)
    {
        $this->fable = $f;
    }

    public function method1($args){
        return $this->fable->f($args);
    }
}
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Why minus voting? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 7 '12 at 11:38
    
Someone downvoted all answers in a row, no idea why, didn't leave a comment. However, in your answer you're using the new operator inside MyClass::f() which will make this tightly coupled again. Instead inject it when MyClass is constructed, it's much easier then, you don't hardcode it, e.g. you can use an interface later on. Won't work with new. - compare: stackoverflow.com/a/8769264/367456 –  hakre Jan 7 '12 at 11:49
    
@hakre As questioner wanted same job flow I made it tight coupled. Its better to use it an interface as a parameter that contain the method. Updated. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 7 '12 at 12:00
    
But then you won't need to call MyClass::f() any longer, you could call $f->f() already. It normally only makes sense with the constructor. Fixed a bit of the code as well. –  hakre Jan 7 '12 at 12:22
    
@hakre, Right you are. Edited. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 7 '12 at 12:29
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If the current class is a child of another class, yes, you can. parent references to the parent class.

From php.net:

<?php
class A {
    function example() {
        echo "I am A::example() and provide basic functionality.<br />\n";
    }
}

class B extends A {
    function example() {
        echo "I am B::example() and provide additional functionality.<br />\n";
        parent::example();
    }
}

$b = new B;

// This will call B::example(), which will in turn call A::example().
$b->example();
?>
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The best you can do here is to extend Class B from Class A

Class B extends Class A

But, you can also:

class ClassA {

  function do_something($args) {
    // Do something
    }

}

class ClassB {

  function do_something_inclassA($args) {
    classA::do_something($args);
    }

}

Important: calling classa::do_something(); is a static call, in other words with error reporting E_STRICT you will get a static notice warning because function do_something() is not static function do_something()

Also, calling this function statically (i.e. classa::do_something()) means that class a's function cannot refer to $this within it

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Care to explain the minus voting? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 7 '12 at 11:25
    
Just because something seems to work does not mean it should be done or encouraged. Hence the warning. –  vascowhite Jan 7 '12 at 11:25
    
"The best you can do" = Encouraged, "But you can also" = Purely educational, thanks Shiplu –  Prof83 Jan 7 '12 at 11:28
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