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Currently, I am working on an event registration system (in php). It has two main purposes: Register guests online before the start of the event, and scan guests onsite with barcode scanners. For this system, it is important to have an online and an offline server, not all events will have access to the internet.

The database will be imported / exported alot from one server to the other and back. On top of that, there will be multiple events concurrently.

To explain the problem which I came across while developing this system, let's assume there are two seperate events (A and B). On the online server guests are able to register for these events. At some point in time event A will take place, so I have to export the database to the offline server for usage onsite. Meanwhile, guests still can register online for event B. Onsite at event A, it is possible to register too for event A, but not for event B.

After event A end, it will be almost impossible to import the offline database to the online one, without altering the data in some way. I figured that I probably have two choices for the database scheme:

  1. Normalize fully: There is a guests table with the property event_id. All other tables dependant on the guests or events will just refer to the primary key of the guest and / or event.
  2. Split tables between events: There are guests tables A_guests and B_guests. All other tables dependant on the guests or events will also be named according to the event.

Importing and exporting will be very easy with choice 2 (and without altering the data), but the number of tables will grow very fast. It is pretty much a dilemma: Normalize but have difficulty with importing / exporting. Or split the tables and have the number of tables grow incredebly fast.

Am I missing an option, or do you consider one of these options the best choice?

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1 Answer 1

At some point in time the event A will take place, so I have to export the database to the offline server for usage onsite. Meanwhile, guests still can register online for event B. Onsite at event A, it is possible to register too.

I want to be sure I understand this. At a point in time, you export the database to the offline server for event A. Guests can no longer register for event A online, but can only register at the site of A. Is this correct? If so, then there's not a problem as long as the online software is made aware of the export.

At event A, you want to let guests register for event B. Is this correct? Because, if so, you're going to have to eventually pass those B transactions back to your online database, and I suppose, hope you don't overbook B. With 2 or more copies of the database, you have no mechanism for preventing overbooking.

Am I missing an option, or do you consider one of these options the best choice?

You want to normalize your booking database fully. Event A needs to have a copy of the entire booking database, if you want to allow people to register for Event B or C or D, etc. at Event A.

The only problem I see is the overbooking problem, as you have all of these copies of the database at various events.

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Almost. After the export of event A, guests can register online only for event B. Guests can register onsite only for event A. Problem is that the onsite guests of event A has to be imported into the online database again. In choice 1, this isn't possible without altering the data in one of the databases. In choice 2, this is possible, but the number of tables will grow really fast. –  Thanaton Jan 7 '12 at 18:54
    
@Thanaton: This is a much simpler problem. Add an offline Boolean column to the guests table. An online registration sets the Boolean false, and an offline registration sets the Boolean true. When you get back from the event, you select the rows from the offline database with the Boolean flag true, and insert them to the online database. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Jan 10 '12 at 16:00

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