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I try to use in my app, simple comparator to filter some data with passing string filter instead function as eg. passed to [].filter Comparator should return function which will be a filter.

   var comparator = function( a, b, c ) { 
        switch( b ){
            case '>=': return function() { return this[a] >= c;}; break;
            case '<=': return function() { return this[a] <= c;}; break;
            case '<':  return function() { return this[a] < c;}; break;
            case '>':  return function() { return this[a] > c;}; break;
            case '=':  return function() { return this[a] == c;}; break;
            case '==': return function() { return this[a] === c;}; break;
            case '!=': return function() { return this[a] != c;}; break;
            default: return null;
        };

    }

Assume that i get this function by:

  var filterFn = comparator.apply({}, /(.+)(=|>=|<=|<|>|!=|==|!==)(.+)/.exec( "id<4" ).slice(1) );


  someModel = someModel.objects.filter( filterFn );

The target it will look:

   someModel.get = function( filter ){ 
      return new Model(  
           this.objects.filter(
               comparator.apply({}, /(.+)(=|>=|<=|<|>|!=|==|!==)(.+)/.exec( "id<4" ).slice(1) 
           ) 
      );
   };
   var filtered = someModel.get( "id<4" );

Question is - I assume that it will be a lot more operators and I have no idea how to write it more simply.

Using Eval is out of question.

This code didn't was both executed and tested I wrote it just to show what I mean.

share|improve this question
    
Is eval() out of the question even if you compare the operator c against an array of known, whitelisted possible values? –  Michael Berkowski Jan 7 '12 at 13:51
1  
Are you going to need a full expression parser, e.g. no only single operators? –  Lucero Jan 7 '12 at 13:53
2  
Note that you don't need break statements after each return. –  nnnnnn Jan 7 '12 at 13:53
    
@nnnnnn I know that. It irritates me that I must rewrite the operators in an expression as well as additional switch list to. Although probably will not be able to do it otherwise. –  abuduba Jan 7 '12 at 14:05
    
Hint from @Michael gives some food for thought... –  abuduba Jan 7 '12 at 14:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Store every function in an object, either pre-defined, or dynamically.

If you want to dyanmically create the set of functions, define the comparator object as shown below. I assumed that you did not extend the Object.prototype. If you did, operators.hasOwnProperty(property) has to be used within the first loop.

// Run only once
var funcs = {};   // Optionally, remove `funcs` and swap `funcs` with `operators`
var operators = { // at the first loop.
    '>=': '>=',
    '<=': '<=',
    '<' :  '<',
    '>' :  '>',
    '=' : '==', //!!
    '==':'===', //!!
    '!=': '!='
}; // Operators

// Function constructor used only once, for construction
for (var operator in operators) {
    funcs[operator] = Function('a', 'c',
                       'return function() {return this[a] ' + operator + ' c};');
}

// Run later
var comparator = function(a, b, c) {
    return typeof funcs[b] === 'function' ? funcs[b](a, c) : null;
};

When comparator is invoked, the returned function looks like:

function() {  return this[a] < c;   }// Where a, c are pre-determined.

This method can be implemented in this way (demo at JSFiddle):

// Assumed that funcs has been defined
function implementComparator(set, key, operator, value) {
    var comparator, newset = [], i;

    if (typeof funcs[operator] === 'function') {
        comparator = funcs[operator](key, value);
    } else { //If the function does not exist...
        throw TypeError("Unrecognised operator");
    }

    // Walk through the whole set
    for (i = 0; i < set.length; i++) {
        //  Invoke the comparator, setting `this` to `set[i]`. If true, push item
        if (comparator.call(set[i])) {
            newset.push(set[i]);
        }
    }
    return newset;
}
var set = [ {meow: 5}, {meow: 3}, {meow: 4}, {meow: 0}, {meow: 9}]
implementComparator( set , 'meow', '<=', 5);
// equals: [ {meow: 5}, {meow: 3}, {meow: 4}, {meow: 0} ]

For clarification, I constructed this answer, while keeping the following in mind:

  • The OP requests an simple, easily extensible method with an unknown/dynamic set of operators.
  • The code is based on the pseudo-code at the OP, without changing anything which could affect the intent of the OP. With some adjustments, this function can also be used for Array.prototype.filter or Array.prototype.sort.
  • eval (or Function) should not be used at every call to comparator
share|improve this answer
    
I totally forgot about creating a function from a string:) Thanks. –  abuduba Jan 7 '12 at 14:09
1  
@abuduba Are you sure about ==, === and !=? Your code doesn't implement a negated identity !== operator. Also, use another RegExp if you want to implement a solid calculator. Currently, your pattern will select any character: (.+) Does also select the operators, if existent. –  Rob W Jan 7 '12 at 14:12
    
This is basically the same as using eval. Just because you don't use the exact function name doesn't mean you're not creating code from a string then running it. Would function not_eval(str) { return eval(str); } also be acceptable? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '12 at 14:16
1  
@Rob W: isn't Function(...) eval in disguise? –  KooiInc Jan 7 '12 at 14:17
1  
Sorry, but I do not think the OP is aware that this is a bad idea in the first place. For this is not how you build a reusable comparator. And as for the memory leaks issue, where is your evidence? For example, in ES5 Strict Mode, the scope chain of eval code is empty. –  PointedEars Jan 7 '12 at 18:14

Don't do it so dynamically....it would be far more efficient to only create the functions once, rather than each time they are called, as that would create a new funciton and so a memory leak each time the compare is done.

var comparator = {
    ">=":  function(a, b) { return a >= b;},    
    "<=":  function(a, b) { return a <= b;},
    "add": function(a, b) { return a + b; },

compare: function(typeString, a, b){
    if(comparator.hasOwnProperty(typeString) == true){

        var theFunction = comparator[typeString];

        return theFunction(a, b);   
    }
    else{
        alert("typeString '" + typeString + "' not supported.");
     }
}, };

var test = comparator.compare(">=", 5, 4);
share|improve this answer
    
Or var test = (5 >= 4);. –  PointedEars Jan 7 '12 at 14:24
var comparator = (function () {
  var fns = {
    '>=': function (a, c) { return a >= c; },
    '<=': function (a, c) { return a <= c; },
    '<':  function (a, c) { return a < c; },
    '>':  function (a, c) { return a > c; },
    '=':  function (a, c) { return a == c; },
    '==': function (a, c) { return a === c; },
    '!=': function (a, c) { return a != c; }
  };

  return function (b) { 
    return fns.hasOwnProperty(b) ? fns[b] : null;
  };
}());

At this point you can see that nothing is more efficient than an inline expression. It is not clear to me why you think you need to be so dynamic beforehand.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I could not see the original code making a lot of sense (operands and operator are in a closure – why not do this inline instead?), so I posted a solution that does make sense to me (fixed operator, variable operands). –  PointedEars Jan 7 '12 at 17:26

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