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I found this happened when I was doing string-to-double converting exercise (e.g. atof in stdlib.h). I wanted to put string of "625" (which indicates a fraction part of a double) to a double variable 0.625. The strange thing is when I put it as part of my exercise, it resulted in inaccurate result 0.62500000000000011 or something alike. However, when I put it in a stand alone way, it worked fine, like the following code:

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
string str = "625";
double mask = 0.1;
double frac = 0.0;
for( int i = 0; i < static_cast<int>(str.length()); ++i ) {
    frac += (str[i] - '0')*mask;
    mask *= 0.1;
}
cout << frac << endl;

}

The code above give the accurate result (0.625). But the following code give the inaccurate result (0.62500000000000011):

string PrintDecimal(string input) {
    long int_part = 0;
    double frac_part = 0.0;
    bool is_positive;
    size_t found;
    string ret_str;
    found = input.find('-');
    if( found == string::npos ) {
        is_positive = true;
    }
    else {
        is_positive = false;
        input.erase(found, 1);
    }
    found = input.find('.');
    if( found == string::npos ) {
        int mask = 1; 
        char app_char;
        for( int i = static_cast<int>(input.length()-1); i > -1; --i ) {
            int_part += (input[i] - '0')*mask;
            mask *= 10;
        }
        while( int_part != 0 ) {
            app_char = (int_part % 2 == 0) ? '0' : '1';
            ret_str.push_back(app_char);
            int_part /= 2;
        }
        if( is_positive == false ) {
            ret_str.append("-");
        }
        reverse(ret_str.begin(), ret_str.end());
    }
    else {
        char app_char;
        long mask_int = 1;
        double mask_frac = 0.1;
        string int_part_str = input.substr(0, found);
        //string frac_part_str = input.substr(found+1, input.length()-found-1);
        string frac_part_str = "0."; 
        frac_part_str.append(input.substr(found+1, input.length()-found-1));
        for( int i = static_cast<int>(int_part_str.length()-1); i > -1; --i ) {
            int_part += (int_part_str[i] - '0')*mask_int;
            mask_int *= 10;
        }
        //This converting causes 6*0.1 = 0.6000000000009
        /*
        for( int i = 0; i < static_cast<int>(frac_part_str.length()); ++i ) {
            frac_part += (frac_part_str[i] - '0')*mask_frac;
            mask_frac *= 0.1;
        }
        */
        frac_part = atof(frac_part_str.c_str()); //This works well.
        while( int_part != 0 ) {
            app_char = (int_part % 2 == 0) ? '0' : '1';
            ret_str.push_back(app_char);
            int_part /= 2;
        }
        if( is_positive == false ) {
            ret_str.append("-");
        }
        reverse(ret_str.begin(), ret_str.end());
        ret_str.push_back('.');
        found = ret_str.find('.');
        while( frac_part != 0.0 ) {
            if( ret_str.length() - found > 64 ) {
                cerr << "Can't express accurately." << endl;
                return "Error";
            }
            frac_part *= 2;
            if( frac_part >= 1.0 ) {
                ret_str.push_back('1');
                frac_part -= 1;
            }
            else {
                ret_str.push_back('0');
            }
        }

    }
    cout << ret_str << endl;

    return ret_str;
}

The compiler version I used was gcc version 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3). Please notice that the commented part in the code, which causes the problem. I ask for your ideas to give a solution to this problem. Thanks!

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5  
Welcome to the wonderful world of floating point. –  Paul Tomblin Jan 7 '12 at 15:08
1  
Looks pretty accurate to me. It's only 0.00000000000000011 out! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '12 at 15:16
    
I think almost everyone is bitten by this with floating point at leads once. If I told you to write 1/3 without fractions you would write 0.3333... and at some point you would need to stop and say (enough is enough). Now, as an exercise, do the same for 1/10 (0.1) but in binary. –  Roger Lindsjö Jan 7 '12 at 15:29
    
@RogerLindsjö But for something like 0.625 which is not infinite long in binary, why put 0.101000000000000000...0001001 for it? –  Xi Duan Jan 7 '12 at 16:16
1  
@XiDuan 0.625 would be fine, but you since 0.1 can not be represented you are doing 6 * approx 0.1 + 2 * approx 0.01 + 5 * approx 0.001. Those approx keep adding up... –  Roger Lindsjö Jan 7 '12 at 16:27
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, actually the first isn't exact either, if we print the result out with more precision we get

0.62500000000000011102

and, printing the intermediate results to full precision

Prelude Text.FShow.RealFloat> mapM_ print $ scanl (+) (FD 0) $ zipWith (*) (iterate (*0.1) 0.1) [6,2,5]
0.0
0.600000000000000088817841970012523233890533447265625
0.62000000000000010658141036401502788066864013671875
0.62500000000000011102230246251565404236316680908203125

To get the most accurate result possible, you have to employ a more complicated algorithm, for example parse the string as a rational number and convert from that.

A quick partial solution is to parse the fractional part to yield numerator / (10^k),

double denominator = 1.0;
uint64_t numerator = 0;
for(i = f0; i < len; ++i) {  // f0 index of first digit after decimal point
    numerator = 10*numerator + (str[i] - '0');
    denominator *= 10;
}
double fractional_part = numerator / denominator;

powers of 10 (with nonnegative exponent) can be represented exactly as doubles for a while (for exponents <= 22, assuming 64-bit IEEE754 doubles) and the numerator can be represented exactly too, if the fractional part is not too long. Then you have only one point where an inexact result occurs due to necessary rounding, the final division, and the result is (supposed to be) the closest representable number to the exact mathematical result. (A further point of inexactness is the addition of the fractional part to the integral part.)

The above will produce good results for input with not too big integral part and short enough fractional parts, but it will be very wrong for long fractional parts.

The correct parsing and displaying of floating point numbers is a complicated business.

share|improve this answer
    
But take 0.625 for example, it is not a decimal fraction whose binary form is infinite long... it can be represented by 0.101 in binary. There is no reason to append such a tiny tail after it. Since it can be represented (in binary form) in a finite way, why it would become like this? –  Xi Duan Jan 7 '12 at 16:10
    
It's a result of the algorithm. Since 0.1 cannot be exactly represented, multiplying by 0.1 introduces approximation errors, and they accumulate. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 7 '12 at 16:32
    
Got it! Thanks a lot! –  Xi Duan Jan 7 '12 at 16:55
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You need to set the precision to be able to output float and doubles up to precision of your choice:
Try using setprecision().

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Thanks Als for providing one of the solution, but I still dont understand the reason that causes the problem. See, atof() works well, what kind of magic in it? –  Xi Duan Jan 7 '12 at 15:26
    
All depends on what internal floating point types are used, and the actual number that it is trying to represent. Use a different compiler or possibly even a different processor, you'll get a slightly different result. Rule one never directly compare two floating points, they are not accurate in laymen's terms they are an approximation. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 7 '12 at 15:39
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It is not strange at all: double is a binary floating-point representation.

That means it will not be able to model some decimal numbers properly.

If this doesn't make sense to you, please read this.

If you intend to model decimals, you may want to try decimal floating-point representation.

So, if have access to a C++11 compiler, like gcc 4.6.1, you can use std::decimal::decimal64 to accurately represent decimals. If not, you can use this lib.

share|improve this answer
    
Understood, I haven't noticed the decimal 0.1, which cannot be represented exactly in binary. Thanks anyway! –  Xi Duan Jan 7 '12 at 16:54
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