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My application works with LAM/MPI, but it crashes with OpenMPI.

Below is how my code looks.

void Comm::nonblocking_send( int s_idx , int e_idx )
{      
      MPI_Wait(&mpireq,&mpistat);


      buffer.clear();

      list<class vertex*>::iterator vit;

      for( vit=our_dag->cur_block_intmeds.begin() ; vit!=our_dag->cur_block_intmeds.end() ; vit++ )
      {
        vertex * v = (*vit);

        list<class edge*> in_edges = v->in_edges;
        list<class edge*>::iterator eit;

        for( eit=in_edges.begin() ; eit!=in_edges.end() ; eit++ )
        {
            int x_idx = (*eit)->src->idx;
            int     y_idx = (*eit)->tgt->idx;
            double  dydx  = (*eit)->partial;

            struct partial * p = new partial();
            //ownership info
            p->rank = our_dag->rank;
            //structural info
            p->x_idx = x_idx;
            p->y_idx = y_idx;
            p->dydx = dydx;
            //block info
            p->block_idx = our_dag->block_idx;
            p->s_idx = s_idx;
            p->e_idx = e_idx;

            buffer.push_back(*p);

            delete p;
        }
      }

      MPI_Isend( &buffer[0] , buffer.size() , MPI_PARTIAL , 0 , DAG_MERG_REQ ,   MPI_COMM_WORLD , &mpireq );    
}

As you can see, at the start of the function, MPI_Wait is called, followed by some computation, and eventually by the respective MPI_ISend at the end of the function.

I keep getting a segmentation fault from within MPI_Wait everytime I run with OpenMPI.

I fixed this by checking whether the function is being called for the first time with the boolean variable *first_time* as follows.

void Comm::nonblocking_send( int s_idx , int e_idx )
    {      
          if(first_time)

               first_time = false;
          else

               MPI_Wait(&mpireq,&mpistat);


          buffer.clear();

          list<class vertex*>::iterator vit;

          for( vit=our_dag->cur_block_intmeds.begin() ; vit!=our_dag->cur_block_intmeds.end() ; vit++ )
          {
            vertex * v = (*vit);

            list<class edge*> in_edges = v->in_edges;
            list<class edge*>::iterator eit;

            for( eit=in_edges.begin() ; eit!=in_edges.end() ; eit++ )
            {
                int x_idx = (*eit)->src->idx;
                int     y_idx = (*eit)->tgt->idx;
                double  dydx  = (*eit)->partial;

                struct partial * p = new partial();
                //ownership info
                p->rank = our_dag->rank;
                //structural info
                p->x_idx = x_idx;
                p->y_idx = y_idx;
                p->dydx = dydx;
                //block info
                p->block_idx = our_dag->block_idx;
                p->s_idx = s_idx;
                p->e_idx = e_idx;

                buffer.push_back(*p);

                delete p;
            }
          }

          MPI_Isend( &buffer[0] , buffer.size() , MPI_PARTIAL , 0 , DAG_MERG_REQ ,   MPI_COMM_WORLD , &mpireq );    
    }

Does anyone here have any idea about this error?

Cheers.

share|improve this question
1  
How are mpireq and mpistat used before this call? How do you call this function? Do all processes call it? Some more context would be useful. –  suszterpatt Jan 7 '12 at 15:25
    
@suszterpatt In the first call to this function in each process except for process 0, MPI_Wait will read unitialised request and status, but in the following calls they will have been initialised by the corresponding MPI_Isend in the previous call. –  cpp_noname Jan 7 '12 at 15:33
1  
Never, ever pass uninitialized data to a function. What you did is essentially Undefined Behavior, and you just got lucky with LAM/MPI. Feel free to post your solution as an aswer and accept it. –  suszterpatt Jan 7 '12 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MPI allows the use of null request handles - MPI_REQUEST_NULL (not to be confused with C/C++ NULL pointers) in calls to MPI_Wait and MPI_Test. Whenever a null request handle is passed to MPI_Wait, the call returns immediately with an empty status, that is the fields of the status object are set as follows:

.MPI_TAG = MPI_ANY_TAG
.MPI_SOURCE = MPI_ANY_SOURCE
.MPI_ERROR = MPI_SUCCESS

Calling MPI_Get_count and MPI_Get_elements with an empty status always returns 0, no matter what datatype is provided. Whenever a null request handle is passed to MPI_Test, the call returns immediately with an empty status and the completion flag is set to true.

Both MPI_Wait and MPI_Test set the request handle of completed operations to MPI_REQUEST_NULL. Allowing null handles to be passed without an error allows for repeated calls to any of the wait/test functions with the same handle variable without any ill effects:

MPI_Isend(..., &req);
// req now contains a handle to the non-blocking send
MPI_Wait(&req, &status);
// The non-blocking send is first completed, then req is set to MPI_REQUEST_NULL
MPI_Wait(&req, &status);
// No-op, returns an empty status

Therefore, for cases like the one in this question, it suffices to set (initialise) the request variable to MPI_REQUEST_NULL in the constructor. No special tests for first calls to the function are necessary and the first version of the code will work as expected.

share|improve this answer

As suszterpatt implies in the coments, calling MPI_Wait with an uninitialized request is undefined, and it's not necessarily surprising that it segfaults. Using an uninitialized request is not equivalent to a no-op. The uninitialized structure contains pointers (in LAM/MPI, for instance, the MPI_Request type was actually itself a pointer to a structure) and if it's not initialized, chances are great you'll get a segfault.

If you want something that's equivalent to a no-op, you could use MPI_Waitall with a count of 0;

void Comm::nonblocking_send( int s_idx , int e_idx )
{     
      if (first_time) count = 0; 
      MPI_Waitall(count, &mpireq,&mpistat);

      /* ... */
      count = 1;
      first_time = false;
      /* ... */

}
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