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I am writing a query for one of my applications that I support, and I am looking for what will cost less in trying to get a DB2 version of an OR statement in the join. Since you can't use "OR" inside on a

Select * 
FROM
  TABLE A INNER JOIN TABLE B
ON 
   A.USERNAME = B.NAME
OR
   A.USERNAME = B.USERNAME

I have been looking at trying UNION or UNION ALL, but I am worried that the match up may take longer to return.

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1  
What's wrong with your statement? You can certainly use an or inside a JOIN condition. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 7 '12 at 16:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While I join others in confirming that OR can easily be used in join conditions, like in any other conditions (and so your query is perfectly fine), you could still do without OR in this particular case.

Conditions like column = value1 OR column = value2, where the same column is tested against a number of various fixed values, could be transformed into column IN (value1, value2). The latter should work no worse than the former and arguably looks clearer in the end.

So:

SELECT *
FROM
  TABLE A
INNER JOIN
  TABLE B
ON 
  A.USERNAME IN (B.NAME, B.USERNAME)
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That's a nice alternative. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 7 '12 at 21:52
    
I have tried again and yes you are able to use the "OR" statement. When I had previously tried it kept receiving an error on it, and the DBA said he didn't think you could with the version of DB2 we are running. Thanks you for your help. Answer marked as excepted. –  em3ricasforsale Jan 8 '12 at 3:49

You can revert to using the WHERE clause syntax for joining. If the DB2 optimizer is clever (and I suspect it is), it should perform equally as well as JOIN:

SELECT * FROM TABLE1 A, TABLE2 B
WHERE A.USERNAME = B.NAME OR A.USERNAME=B.USERNAME
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The issue that I see you running into here though is that you are not defining the Join here and could potentially allow the optimizer to link up the tables based on invalid criteria. –  em3ricasforsale Jan 7 '12 at 16:30
    
There is no need to do it like that. An OR is allowed in the JOIN condition. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 7 '12 at 16:37

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