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Can anyone suggest to me how I can pass a parameter to a thread?

Also, how does it work for anonymous classes?

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2  
Would you mind to add some extra explanation of that exactly you trying to do? There are a lot of several techniques to it, but all of them depend on the final goal. –  Artem Barger May 18 '09 at 10:40
2  
Do you mean passing a parameter to an already running thread ? Because all the current answers are about passing parameters to new threads... –  Valentin Rocher May 18 '09 at 10:43
    
I added an edit. My mistake. –  steve May 18 '09 at 10:54

10 Answers 10

up vote 150 down vote accepted

You need to pass the parameter in the constructor to the thread object:

public class MyThread implements Runnable {

   public MyThread(Object parameter) {
       // store parameter for later user
   }

   public void run() {
   }
}

and invoke it thus:

Runnable r = new MyThread(param_value);
new Thread(r).start();
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1  
Shouldnt that be 'new Thread(new MyThread(param_value)).start()? –  PaulJWilliams May 18 '09 at 10:44
1  
fixed before you commented –  Alnitak May 18 '09 at 10:45
    
just tried this. don't you need public void MyThread(...)? –  jason m Nov 22 '12 at 14:15
3  
@jasonm no, it's a constructor - constructors don't have a return type. –  Alnitak Nov 22 '12 at 16:30
    
This means that each Thread constructed using r will have the same argument, so if we want to pass different arguments to multiple Threads running MyThread we'd need to create a new MyThread instance using the desired argument for each Thread. In other words, to get a thread up and running we need to create two objects: Thread and MyThread. Is this considered bad, performance-wise? –  Isaac Kleinman Oct 15 '13 at 21:19

For Anonymous classes:

In response to question edits here is how it works for Anonymous classes

   final X parameter = ...; // the final is important
   Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable() {
       p = parameter;
       public void run() { 
         ...
       };
   t.start();

Named classes:

You have a class that extends Thread (or implements Runnable) and a constructor with the parameters you'd like to pass. Then, when you create the new thread, you have to pass in the arguments, and then start the thread, something like this:

Thread t = new MyThread(args...);
t.start();

Runnable is a much better solution than Thread BTW. So I'd prefer:

   public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {
      private X parameter;
      public MyRunnable(X parameter) {
         this.parameter = parameter;
      }

      public void run() {
      }
   }
   Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(parameter));
   t.start();

This answer is basically the same as this similar question: How to pass parameters to a Thread object

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I have code similar to your anonymous class example, except I access parameter directly from the run() method without using a field like p at all. It seems to work. Is there some subtle multithreading thing I am missing by not copying parameter to p beforehand? –  Randall Cook Jun 6 at 22:34

via constructor of a Runnable or Thread class

class MyThread extends Thread {

    private String to;

    public MyThread(String to) {
        this.to = to;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("hello " + to);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new MyThread("world!").start();
}
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+1 for showing how to do it extending Thread instead of implementing Runnable. –  user2104648 Nov 6 at 18:11

When you create a thread, you need an instance of Runnable. The easiest way to pass in a parameter would be to pass it in as an argument to the constructor:

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

    private volatile String myParam;

    public MyRunnable(String myParam){
        this.myParam = myParam;
        ...
    }

    public void run(){
        // do something with myParam here
        ...
    }

}

MyRunnable myRunnable = new myRunnable("Hello World");
new Thread(myRunnable).start();

If you then want to change the parameter while the thread is running, you can simply add a setter method to your runnable class:

public void setMyParam(String value){
    this.myParam = value;
}

Once you have this, you can change the value of the parameter by calling like this:

myRunnable.setMyParam("Goodbye World");

Of course, if you want to trigger an action when the parameter is changed, you will have to use locks, which makes things considerably more complex.

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You can either extend the Thread class or the Runnable class and provide parameters as you want. There are simple examples in the docs. I'll port them here:

 class PrimeThread extends Thread {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeThread(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }

     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
 }

 PrimeThread p = new PrimeThread(143);
 p.start();

 class PrimeRun implements Runnable {
     long minPrime;
     PrimeRun(long minPrime) {
         this.minPrime = minPrime;
     }

     public void run() {
         // compute primes larger than minPrime
          . . .
     }
 }


 PrimeRun p = new PrimeRun(143);
 new Thread(p).start();
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Either write a class that implements Runnable, and pass whatever you need in a suitably defined constructor, or write a class that extends Thread with a suitably defined constructor that calls super() with appropriate parameters.

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To create a thread you normally create your own implementation of Runnable. Pass the parameters to the thread in the constructor of this class.

class MyThread implements Runnable
{

   private int a;
   private String b;
   private double c;

   public MyThread(int a, String b, double c)
   {
      this.a = a;
      this.b = b;
      this.c = c;
   }

   public void run()
   {
      doSomething(a, b, c);
   }

}
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You can derive a class from Runnable, and during the construction (say) pass the parameter in.

Then launch it using Thread.start(Runnable r);

If you mean whilst the thread is running, then simply hold a reference to your derived object in the calling thread, and call the appropriate setter methods (synchronising where appropriate)

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Parameter passing via the start() and run() methods:

// Tester
public static void main(String... args) throws Exception {
    ThreadType2 t = new ThreadType2(new RunnableType2(){
        public void run(Object object) {
            System.out.println("Parameter="+object);
        }});
    t.start("the parameter");
}

// New class 1 of 2
public class ThreadType2 {
    final private Thread thread;
    private Object objectIn = null;
    ThreadType2(final RunnableType2 runnableType2) {
        thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                runnableType2.run(objectIn);
            }});
    }
    public void start(final Object object) {
        this.objectIn = object;
        thread.start();
    }
    // If you want to do things like setDaemon(true); 
    public Thread getThread() {
        return thread;
    }
}

// New class 2 of 2
public interface RunnableType2 {
    public void run(Object object);
}
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One further option; this approach lets you use the Runnable item like an asynchronous function call. If your task does not need to return a result, e.g. it just performs some action you don't need to worry about how you pass back an "outcome".

This pattern lets you reuse an item, where you need some kind of internal state. When not passing parameter(s) in the constructor care is needed to mediate the programs access to parameters. You may need more checks if your use-case involves different callers, etc.

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable 
{
  private final Boolean PARAMETER_LOCK  = false;
  private X parameter;

  public MyRunnable(X parameter) {
     this.parameter = parameter;
  }

  public void setParameter( final X newParameter ){

      boolean done = false;
      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          if( null == parameter )
          {
              parameter = newParameter;
              done = true;
          }
      }
      if( ! done )
      {
          throw new RuntimeException("MyRunnable - Parameter not cleared." );
      }
  }


  public void clearParameter(){

      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          parameter = null;
      }
  }


  public void run() {

      X localParameter;

      synchronize( PARAMETER_LOCK )
      {
          localParameter = parameter;
      }

      if( null != localParameter )
      {
         clearParameter();   //-- could clear now, or later, or not at all ...
         doSomeStuff( localParameter );
      }

  }

}

Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(parameter)); t.start();

If you need a result of processing, you will also need to coordinate completion of MyRunnable when the sub-task finishes. You could pass a call back or just wait on the Thread 't', etc.

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