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How would I do this:

{:foo => ['foo', 'bar'] } 

foo is an actual variable, which returns 123. What I'm really trying to do is:

{:1234 => ['foo', 'bar'] }
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, in a hash both the key and the value can be any object. You just need to make sure you're creating a valid object. :1234 is not a valid symbol. You could use

x = {1234 => ['foo', 'bar']}

You would access the array using x[1234].

On another note, if you want to use a symbol, it must begin with a character, not a digit:

x = {:poke => ['foo', 'bar']}

And you would access it using x[:poke].

Most commonly the key is: Fixnum, String or Symbol, but not limited to them.

You could also have some abstract class which you created and use it as the key, but I never had the need for that; doesn't mean it's not practical.

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You beat me to it for 4 minutes :) –  fguillen Jan 7 '12 at 18:36
    
@fguillen I didn't really bother providing any proof. So, your answer is probably a bit more accurate than mine. :) –  destiel starship Jan 7 '12 at 18:40
    
All valid answers, but yea, :1234 is not a valid symbol. Thanks for clearing that up –  Christian Fazzini Jan 7 '12 at 20:27
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Have you tried using:

{foo => ['foo', 'bar'] }

That will result in a hash element of:

{123 => ['foo', 'bar'] }

and can be accessed from the hash using either 123 or foo.


You can also play tricks on Ruby's Hashes:

foo = 123                    # => 123
{ foo => [1,2] }             # => {123=>[1, 2]}
{ :123 => [1,2] }
SyntaxError: (irb):3: syntax error, unexpected tINTEGER, expecting tSTRING_CONTENT or tSTRING_DBEG or tSTRING_DVAR or tSTRING_END
{ :123 => [1,2] }
      ^
{ foo.to_sym => [1,2] }
NoMethodError: undefined method `to_sym' for 123:Fixnum

{ foo.to_s.to_sym => [1,2] } # => {:"123"=>[1, 2]}
{ :"123" => [1,2] }          # => {:"123"=>[1, 2]}
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Ah, yours is more to the point. ~ Well, I'll leave mine anyway. Someone might find it "educational." –  destiel starship Jan 7 '12 at 18:33
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I think a number can't be a symbol :

ruby-1.9.2-p0 > :1
SyntaxError: (irb):7: syntax error, unexpected tINTEGER, expecting tSTRING_CONTENT or tSTRING_DBEG or tSTRING_DVAR or tSTRING_END

If you don't care to use a proper symbol you can do this:

ruby-1.9.2-p0 > foo = "wadus"
 => "wadus" 
ruby-1.9.2-p0 > { foo.to_sym => [1,2] }
 => {:wadus=>[1, 2]} 
ruby-1.9.2-p0 > { foo.to_sym => [1,2] }[:wadus]
 => [1, 2] 
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A numeric string can be a symbol. You just have to use the right syntax like :"123" which is equivalent to "123".to_sym which in turn is functionally equivalent to 123.to_s.to_sym. –  Holger Just Jan 7 '12 at 22:40
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