Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What shall I do in this example to trigger the right operator:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& a){cout << "class A";}
};
class B : public A
{
public:
    void operator/(B& b){cout << "class B";}
};

int main()
{
    A* a = new B;
    A* b = new B;
    *a / *b;
    return 0;
}

The output is "class A" but it should be "class B".
How can I solve this? Thanks.

EDIT: According to answers... should I do this for every derived class:

class A
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& a){cout << "class A";}
};
class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& a) override {cout << "class B";}
};
class C : public B
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& a) override {cout << "class C";}
};
class D: public C
{
public:
    void operator/(A& a) override {cout << "class D";}
};
int main()
{
    A* a = new D;
    A* b = new D;
    *a / *b;
    //...
}
share|improve this question
    
I think your proposed answer is still wrong. I think you should focus on clarifying the question. For example, you want to print 'class X', where X is the most-derived class which is compatible with both operands. Is this what you're trying to say? –  Aaron McDaid Jan 7 '12 at 19:09
    
@Aaron for example: Pointer to class A is pointer to class X(most derived) A* a = new X; that's where I'm confused... means we have to everride all classes since pointer to class A could sometimes be a pointer to B in same porgram... A* a = new B; –  codekiddy Jan 7 '12 at 19:24
    
Please, focus on clarifying your goal. Given *x / *y, do you wish to identify the most derived class which is compatible with both operands? Once you clarify your goal, we can all try to solve it. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 7 '12 at 19:30
    
To all concerned. I think we face three tasks. First: identify the ultimate goal here - defining (in plain English) the desired behaviour. Second: Explain why the code in the question fails to achieve the desired behaviour. Third: Write correct code. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 7 '12 at 19:35
    
My goal is very simple: "Is there other way to achive same thing in my edited question" in shorter way or more efficient way. thanks. @Aaron I want to divide classes new D and new D whose pointers are pointing to class A (most base class) –  codekiddy Jan 7 '12 at 19:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(First, I'm going to try to explain what's happening at the moment, but at the end I'll try to write a 'correct' program.)

I'm going to use x and y instead of a and b - it's bit less confusing.

A* x = new C;
A* y = new B;
*x / *y;

The static type of x is A - i.e. that's what the type of the variable is. The dynamic type, the real type of the object pointed at by the variable, is C.

The static type of y is A - i.e. that's what the type of the variable is. The dynamic type, the real type of the object pointed at by the variable, is B.

So there are four types that seem to be involved here. But actually, the dynamic type of y is never relevant, as we will see. So that leaves (at most) three relevant types. To understand this, let's rewrite the expression as follows:

x -> operator/ (*y);

First, the compiler looks at the static type of x. In this case it is A. Then it looks for a method in the static type with the appropriate signature. What does 'appropriate signature' mean? The answer is that method lookup ignores the dynamic type of variables. The static type of y is A, and hence operator/(A&) is selected. (We know y is really a B, but that's ignored. )Finally, the runtime will look at the dynamic type of x (ignoring y). The dynamic type is C. Because the operator/(A&) was virtual in A, then the runtime will actually call the C::operator/(A&) instead.

In short, the dynamic type of y is not relevant. The methods operator/(B&) or operator/(C&) will never be called. Those methods should be deleted.

There's a fundamental asymmetry here. In *y / *x, the dynamic type of y would be relevant, but not the dynamic type of x.

How to fix it

Before 'fixing' the problem, we need to be sure we know what the question is. Hence, I'll clarify my interpretation first. If this is the wrong interpretation, apologies in advance.

I'm going to assume that the questioner intends that the dynamic type of x will always be the same as the dynamic type of y, and that if they are different then there should be an error message. For example, this code is expected to work:

A * x = new A;
A * y = new A;
*x / *y; // divide an instance of A by another instance of A

and

A * x = new B;
A * y = new B;
*x / *y; // divide an instance of B by another instance of B

and

A * x = new C;
A * y = new C;
*x / *y; // divide an instance of C by another instance of C

but not

A * x = new B;
A * y = new C;
*x / *y; // should give an error

or

A * x = new C;
A * y = new B;
*x / *y; // should give an error

Here is a complete program that does this:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <cassert>
using namespace std;
class A
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& z) {
            assert(typeid(z) == typeid(*this));
            cout << "class A" << endl;
    }
};
class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& z) {
            assert(typeid(z) == typeid(*this));
            cout << "class B" << endl;
            B& b = dynamic_cast<B&>(z);
    }
};
class C : public B
{
public:
    virtual void operator/(A& z) {
            assert(typeid(z) == typeid(*this));
            cout << "class C" << endl;
            C& c = dynamic_cast<C&>(z);
    }
};
int main()
{
    A* x = new C;
    A* y = new C;
    *x / *y;
}

The operators in B and C do two things:

  • test that the type of the second operand is as expected. i.e. confirm that both side of the / have the same type.
  • cast the A& to the appropriate type, allowing the division code to have full access to both operands
share|improve this answer
    
thanks alot for explaining this, also thanks for comments which are also valuable! oh... tnx for edit too :D I see now –  codekiddy Jan 7 '12 at 22:14

You don't actually override the operator/ from A, since B::operator/ has a different method signature then A::operator/ (parameter is of type B& instead of A&). So your call of operator/ on an object of type A& will call the only existing operator/ for class A, which may be virtual, but isn't overriden in class B. Therefore what you need to do is change the operator/ of B to

    void operator/(A& b){std::cout << "class B"<<std::endl;}

Note that *b couldn't be used as an argument for your B::operator/ anyways, since it is of type A& and not of type B&.

share|improve this answer

The B::operator/ is not an override for A::operator/ because their parameters are different.

You can only override virtual functions (or operators) if their signatures are compatible.

share|improve this answer

Operator overloading is resolved compile time using the static type and there's only one overload (the one in class A) that can handle an A (*b is an A to the compiler)

share|improve this answer

Two reasons:

  • B::operator/(B&) is not an override for A::operator/(A&), so it will never get called in a polymorphic situation.
  • B::operator/ takes a B& as a parameter, but the static type of *b is A.
share|improve this answer
    
so in multiple inhertance of for example 5 classes I'll have to override each opearotr for each base and subbase class? –  codekiddy Jan 7 '12 at 18:56
    
@codekiddy: It depends on what behaviour you want. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 7 '12 at 18:57
    
Only the first reason is relevant, really. The other operator won't even be considered for overload resolution because the static type of *a is A. –  Charles Bailey Jan 7 '12 at 18:59
    
@Charles: I listed the second reason because the first problem could be "fixed" by adding a virtual void A::operator/(B&) function... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 7 '12 at 19:00
    
This is a good example of a very annoying limitation of the polymorphism in many languages, including C++ and Java. Ideally, it wouldn't just be polymorphic in the type of this. The version of A::foo that is inherited into B would ideally be of 'type' operator/ (B& this, B& x); rather than the current operator/ (B& this, A& x);. Other languages, such as Haskell (up to a point), have a more flexible idea of this. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 7 '12 at 19:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.