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I need to cache lots (Several TB) of files up to 50 MB each. Since Memory is way too expensive and Memcached doesn't support these sizes I'm looking for a LRU based solution that saves its data on the HDD and is capable of scaling horizontally in terms of cache size and thoughtput.

Is there such a software?

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how are these files generated? –  Wes Freeman Jan 7 '12 at 19:40
    
User uploaded videos. They are stored on a single server and that is not very scalable. I want to add a caching layer infront of all servers. –  Jens Fischer Jan 7 '12 at 19:55

2 Answers 2

What you're really asking for is a distributed file system, I think, since you don't really need to cache anything--it's not dynamic data.

You might consider something like this. http://learnmongo.com/posts/getting-started-with-mongodb-gridfs/

Or this: http://hadoop.apache.org/common/docs/current/hdfs_user_guide.html

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Would something like varnish cache with storage_file be too simplistic?

If you need more of a scalable, pretty easy to set up distributed file system, I've used MogileFS (http://danga.com/mogilefs/) with very good results.

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AFAIK you can create a varnish cluster but adding more servers doesn't mean that the overall storage capacy increases since each varnish server has its own cache. What I need is a large (10TB+) HDD based LRU caching storage that I can expand as I want by adding more servers. –  Jens Fischer Jan 7 '12 at 20:01
    
Yes, you can solve it with Varnish and load balancing, but something like MogileFS (updated answer above) seems more like what you need to make administration much easier. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 7 '12 at 20:21

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