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The following are my codes but it cant handle more than 500 lines at one time.

It needs to add a , to the end of the line and at the same time detect. What i'm currently doing is separating them into 2 different textbox then save the one which i need by copy pasting but the app seems to hang if the file is too big.

Can someone help me with making it more efficient. Would really appreciate it.

 private void button1_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.Cancel)
            return;

        System.IO.StreamReader Reader = new System.IO.StreamReader(openFileDialog1.FileName);

        //Create a filestream

        FileStream fStr;

        try
        {
            //Set filestream to the result of the pick of the user

            fStr = new FileStream(openFileDialog1.FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);


            //Create a streamreader, sr, to read the file

            StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fStr);

            //While the end of the file has not been reached...

            while (sr.Peek() >= 0)
            {
                //Create a 'line' that contains the current line of the textfile

                string line = sr.ReadLine().ToLower();

                if (line.Contains("staff"))
                {

                    line += ","; //Add a , to the end of the line**Important**
                    textBox1.Text += line + Environment.NewLine;
                    releventcount += 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    line += ","; //Add a , to the end of the line**Important**
                    textBox2.Text += line + Environment.NewLine;
                    irreleventcount += 1;
                }

                label1.Text = "Relevent: ";
                label2.Text = "Irrelevant: ";
            }
            //Close the file so other modules can access it
            sr.Close();
            //If something goes wrong, tell the user
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

            MessageBox.Show("Error opening file", "Check the CODE ! ~.~");
        }


    }
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Consider posting on Code Review. –  James Jan 7 '12 at 20:17
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what it is you're eventually trying to accomplish here. There are several more succinct ways to do what your current code is doing, but they won't significantly improve the speed of reading.

The bottleneck in your code is that you're appending strings. Using a StringBuilder is good advice, but you can do better than that by creating a List<string> and then calling string.Join at the end. For example:

if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.Cancel)
    return;
List<string> staff = new List<string>();
List<string> other = new List<string>();

foreach (var line in File.ReadLines(openFileDialog1.FileName))
{
    line = line.ToLower();
    if (line.Contains("staff"))
    {
        staff.Add(line);
    }
    else
    {
        other.Add(line);
    }
}

relevantcount = staff.Count;
irrelevantCount = other.Count;

textBox1.Text = string.Join(","+Environment.NewLine, staff);
textBox2.Text = string.Join("."+Environment.NewLine, other);

Also, you say that your code can only handle 500 lines at a time. Is there something in your user interface that prevents it from handling more? Certainly, there's nothing in the code you showed that has such a low limit.

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Are you sure that List<string> and join is more efficient than stringbuilder? With a stringbuilder, .net adds the strings into a pre-allocated buffer and, given the constraints of the question, you can very easily determine exactly how much to allocate. With the list<string> approach, you will have as many string objects as lines, which then have to be managed, disposed, etc. To me, it seems much more efficient for .net to have to process and store the strings twice. –  competent_tech Jan 7 '12 at 22:41
    
@competent_tech: I'm not sure which would be faster, but I doubt there'd be much difference. I/O time will dominate. I don't see where you can say that you know how much to allocate for the StringBuilder. I suppose you could look at the file size, but you could also estimate the list capacity to avoid re-allocations. There might be some additional overhead if a garbage collection is triggered while the lists are in scope, but the disposal problem exists even if you're using StringBuilder. To be honest, I like my approach primarily because the code is simpler. –  Jim Mischel Jan 8 '12 at 0:13
    
Thank you! I definitely learnt something here –  user1423213 Jan 8 '12 at 2:00
    
Is it possible to do something like this too? List<string> other = new List<string>(); (line.contains(other)) <<gives me error >.< –  user1423213 Jan 8 '12 at 2:12
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500 lines is nothing.

Try File.ReadAllLines and File.WriteAllLines.

Then you can do your work on an array of strings in memory and avoid the iterative IO.

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Reading files line by line is very slow. You can make this code much faster by reading a large block of data (or even the entire file if it's not too enormous). For example, use a File.ReadAllLines to read the entire file as separate lines, or use a FileStream and Read() into a buffer, and find the individual lines for yourself by looking for newline (\n, \r) characters.

To export the data, don't copy and paste it fom a text box - Write the results to one or two new files, and then just open them.

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It is much, much more efficient to use StringBuilders to gather the text for the textboxes than to continuously append text.

Also, you should wrap your various streams in using blocks.

Here is a rewrite that should be much more efficient:

    private void button1_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.Cancel)
            return;

        try
        {
            //Set filestream to the result of the pick of the user
            using (var fStr = new FileStream(openFileDialog1.FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
            {
                //Create a streamreader, sr, to read the file
                using (var sr = new StreamReader(fStr))
                {
                    var sbTextBox1 = new System.Text.StringBuilder(10000);
                    var sbTextBox2 = new System.Text.StringBuilder(10000);

                    //While the end of the file has not been reached...
                    while (sr.Peek() >= 0)
                    {
                        //Create a 'line' that contains the current line of the textfile
                        string line = sr.ReadLine().ToLower();

                        if (line.Contains("staff"))
                        {
                            //Add a , to the end of the line**Important**
                            sbTextBox1.Append(line).Append(",").AppendLine();
                            releventcount += 1;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            //Add a , to the end of the line**Important**
                            sbTextBox2.Append(line).Append(",").AppendLine();
                            irreleventcount += 1;
                        }
                    }

                    textBox1.Text = sbTextBox1.ToString();
                    textBox2.Text = sbTextBox2.ToString();

                    label1.Text = "Relevent: ";
                    label2.Text = "Irrelevant: ";

                    //Close the file so other modules can access it
                    sr.Close();
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Error opening file", "Check the CODE ! ~.~");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, what you want is sb.TextBox.Append(line).AppendLine(",") Otherwise you'll have a leading comma. Of course, with mine you end up with a trailing comma . . . –  Jim Mischel Jan 7 '12 at 20:37
    
Good catch, thanks. I also was using sbTextBox1 instead of sbTextBox2 in the else statement. Both have been fixed –  competent_tech Jan 7 '12 at 22:32
    
Yes, StringBuilder is more efficient, however in this case, you won't notice any difference in time. 500 is not a big number. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 7 '12 at 22:42
    
Totally agreed, but I try not to be constrained by the current limitations when designing a solution. For example, what if the 500 lines is a test dataset and the real data is 5000000 lines? Or what if a future visitor to the question has a similar issue, but with a much larger set of data? Designing to what is in place now, I have found, generally leads to problems down the road. –  competent_tech Jan 7 '12 at 22:51
    
Thank you! I definitely learnt something here Thanks will read about String builder now :P –  user1423213 Jan 8 '12 at 2:02
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