Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use python script in gdb, but I have some questions, how can I let these commands result redirected to my python script?

I mean, when I use "info f", in gdb, it will print the infomation about the ebp, eip infomation... For now I want to let these infomation do not show on the screen, but to redirect to variable.

For example, in my python script, there is a string called "str1", so I want str1=gdb.command("info f"), I try some ways to do, but the infomation will show on the screen, how can I remove it from screen, just store it in a string ?

share|improve this question
    
Does someone know the way to do it? Thanks!!!!! This is a assignment, I must use gdb, and python script. –  user1118486 Jan 7 '12 at 23:18

3 Answers 3

Here is an example:

(gdb) info frame
Stack level 0, frame at 0x7fffffffd960:
 rip = 0x7ffff7dec680 in *__GI__dl_debug_state (dl-debug.c:77); saved rip 0x7ffff7de0731
 called by frame at 0x7fffffffdab0
 source language c.
 Arglist at 0x7fffffffd950, args: 
 Locals at 0x7fffffffd950, Previous frame's sp is 0x7fffffffd960
 Saved registers:
  rip at 0x7fffffffd958

(gdb) python str1 = gdb.execute("info frame", False, True)
(gdb) python print str1
Stack level 0, frame at 0x7fffffffd960:
 rip = 0x7ffff7dec680 in *__GI__dl_debug_state (dl-debug.c:77); saved rip 0x7ffff7de0731
 called by frame at 0x7fffffffdab0
 source language c.
 Arglist at 0x7fffffffd950, args: 
 Locals at 0x7fffffffd950, Previous frame's sp is 0x7fffffffd960
 Saved registers:
  rip at 0x7fffffffd958

Documentation here.

share|improve this answer
    
HOHO, that's what I want!!! So, how about the "Flase" and "True" in the function? Thanks!! –  user1118486 Jan 7 '12 at 23:21
    
You do know how to read documentation, right? –  Employed Russian Jan 7 '12 at 23:27
    
Yes!! Thanks, I just saw it. –  user1118486 Jan 7 '12 at 23:38

gdb.execute (command [, from_tty [, to_string]]) is what're you( we :D ) seeking for. You may look at a function decription. The first argument is quoted GDB command, the second I didn't really understood, I suppose because I don't need it, just keep it false. And the third determines where a command output will be streamed. If false(default), it's just going to be printed, if true, output will be wrapped as a string and return to you, so you may assign it to a variable.

An example:

(gdb) py MyVar = gdb.execute("info f",False,True)
(gdb) py print(MyVar)
Stack level 0, frame at 0x7fffffffdda0:
 rip = 0x4006a6 in open@plt; saved rip 0x4007b9
 called by frame at 0x7fffffffddc0
 Arglist at 0x7fffffffdd90, args: 
 Locals at 0x7fffffffdd90, Previous frame's sp is 0x7fffffffdda0
 Saved registers:
  rip at 0x7fffffffdd98

(gdb) 

You may also be interested in gdb.parse_and_eval (expression). It gives an easy way to use so called convinience variables of GDB:

(gdb) set $MyVar = "PinkyPie is the best!"
(gdb) pi
>>> MyStr = gdb.parse_and_eval("$MyVar")
>>> print(MyStr)
"PinkyPie is the best!"
>>> 
(gdb) 
share|improve this answer

why don't you use pdb instead?

You can write import pdb to anywhere in your code and set breakpoint with writing pdb.set_trace()

After this, when you start the program with pdb the_script.py it will stop at the place where you have written pdb.set_trace()

For more details, checkout http://pythonconquerstheuniverse.wordpress.com/2009/09/10/debugging-in-python/

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer has nothing to do with the question OP asked. –  Employed Russian Jan 7 '12 at 23:14
    
Opps, I've read again, and unfortunately you're right, sorry. –  Serdar Dalgic Jan 7 '12 at 23:16
    
The problem is that, this assignment require me to use gdb, and use python script to create command in gdb..... –  user1118486 Jan 7 '12 at 23:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.