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I want to remove all elements from a list I want to iterate over a list, skipping elements that match some test, and a certain number of elements after that match. eg.

# skip 'foo' and 2 subsequent values

values = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']

result = [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]

Is there a more elegant method to achieve this than iterating using a counter building a new list and skipping forwards n iteratations when the match is found? ie.

values = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']

result = []

i = 0
while i < len(values):
    if values[i] == 'foo':
        i += 3
    else:
        result.append(values[i])
        i += 1

print result
[1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
share|improve this question
    
Please show the code you have so far. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 7 '12 at 22:33
    
How should it handle [1, 'foo', 3, 'foo', 5, 6, 7]? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 7 '12 at 22:42
    
That would return [1, 5, 6, 7] I suppose. The use case assumes that after each occurrence of foo will follow two values we don't care about. –  Acorn Jan 7 '12 at 22:45
    
@Acorn: You have two occurrences of foo. According to your rule, the second occurrence means that you don't care about the 5 and the 6. –  John Machin Jan 7 '12 at 23:33
    
@JohnMachin: With my problem, that will never be the case, but if it was, then most obvious solutions involving skipping would skip the second 'foo'. A solution that would ignore 5, 6 in that case would be fine too. –  Acorn Jan 7 '12 at 23:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hmm, how about a generator?

def iterskip(iterator, test, n):
    """Iterate skipping values matching test, and n following values"""
    iterator = iter(iterator)
    while 1:
        value = next(iterator)
        if test(value):
            for dummy in range(n):
                next(iterator)
        else:
            yield value

def is_foo(value):
    return value == 'foo'

print list(iterskip(values, is_foo, 2))
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice solution, +1. A few nits: 1. Use next(iterator) instead of the obsolete iterator.next() (provided you are using at least 2.6). 2. Please don't use _ as a variable name. People tend to mistake this as some special syntax -- using dummy or similar instead avoids any confusion. –  Sven Marnach Jan 7 '12 at 23:15
    
Thanks for the pointers! Updated. –  Acorn Jan 7 '12 at 23:22

Just slice-delete.

>>> values = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
>>> values.index('foo')
3
>>> del values[3:3 + 3]
>>> values.index('foo')
5
>>> del values[5:5 + 3]
>>> values.index('foo')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: 'foo' is not in list
>>> values
[1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
share|improve this answer
1  
This is O(n^2) in the worst case, while the original code is O(n). –  Sven Marnach Jan 7 '12 at 22:41
    
Certainly there's room for optimization, including using the start argument to list.index(). –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 7 '12 at 22:48

And now, a coroutine solution.

def countdown(val, count):
  curr = 0
  while True:
    now = (yield curr)
    if curr > 0:
      curr -= 1
    if now == val:
      curr = count

values = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
c = countdown('foo', 3)
c.next()
print [x for x in values if not c.send(x)]
share|improve this answer
    
Neat. You could use list(ifilterfalse(c.send, values)) in the last line. (I'm not suggesting this would be any better.) –  Sven Marnach Jan 7 '12 at 23:30

Write a simple function to work with del slices of the list:

import copy
def del_sublists(list, value, length, copy_list = False):
    if copy_list:
        list = copy.deepcopy(list)
    while value in list:
        del list[list.index(value):list.index(value) + (length + 1)]
    return list

a = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
print del_sublists(a, 'foo', 2)
print a

output:

[1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
[1, 2, 3, 6, 7]

and same but not changing the variable:

a = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
print del_sublists(a, 'foo', 2, copy_list = True)
print a

output:

[1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
[1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
share|improve this answer

Depends on your definition of elegant, and whether you want to do what your question title says (remove from a list i.e. not making a new list).

The first function below safely mutates the existing list by iterating backwards and deleting the unwanted stuff. The second function iterates forwards using list.index until the marker is not found (IOW what Ignacio's answer suggested). The third function is a modified version of the first, assuming that the question is taken literally e.g. ['foo', 'foo', 1, 2] is reduced to [], not [2].

Code:

def inplace_munge_1(alist, query, size):
    for i in xrange(len(alist) - 1, -1, -1):
        if alist[i] == query:
            del alist[i:i+size]

def inplace_munge_2(alist, query, size):
    start = 0
    while True:
        try:
            i = alist.index(query, start)
        except ValueError:
            return
        del alist[i:i+size]
        start = i

def inplace_munge_3(alist, query, size):
    marker = len(alist)
    delpos = []
    for i in xrange(len(alist) - 1, -1, -1):
        if alist[i] == query:
            for j in xrange(min(i + size, marker) - 1, i - 1, -1):
                delpos.append(j)
            marker = i
    for j in delpos:
        del alist[j]

funcs = [inplace_munge_1, inplace_munge_2, inplace_munge_3]

tests = [
    [],
    [1],
    ['foo'],
    [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y'],
    ['foo', 'foo', 1, 2, 3],
    ]

fmt = "%-15s: %r"    
for test in tests:
    print
    print fmt % ("Input", test)
    for func in funcs:
        values = test[:]
        func(values, 'foo', 3)
        print fmt % (func.__name__, values)

Output:

Input          : []
inplace_munge_1: []
inplace_munge_2: []
inplace_munge_3: []

Input          : [1]
inplace_munge_1: [1]
inplace_munge_2: [1]
inplace_munge_3: [1]

Input          : ['foo']
inplace_munge_1: []
inplace_munge_2: []
inplace_munge_3: []

Input          : [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
inplace_munge_1: [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
inplace_munge_2: [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]
inplace_munge_3: [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]

Input          : ['foo', 'foo', 1, 2, 3]
inplace_munge_1: []
inplace_munge_2: [2, 3]
inplace_munge_3: [3]
share|improve this answer

A good solution using a defined function:

def special_remove(my_list, item, start=0):
    try:
        pos = my_list.index(item, start)
        return special_remove(my_list[:pos] + my_list[pos+3:], item, pos)
    except ValueError:
        return my_list

And using the function with your data:

>>> values = [1, 2, 3, 'foo', 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y']
>>> special_remove(values, 'foo') [1, 2, 3, 6, 7]

Good thing about this code is that it won't fail even if you want to remove out-of-range elements, for example:

>>> values = [1, 'foo']
>>> special_remove(values, 'foo')
[1]
share|improve this answer

Functional version:

It's a bit messy, though.

def unfold(f, x):
    while True:
        try:
            w, x = f(x)
        except TypeError:
            raise StopIteration
        yield w

def test(info):
    values, cur_values, n = info
    length = len(values)

    if n == length:
        return None
    elif n == length-1:
        cur_values = cur_values + [values[n]]
    elif values[n] == "foo" and n < len(values)-2:
        n += 3

    return (cur_values, (values, cur_values + [values[n]], n+1))

values = [1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 'foo', 'x', 'y', 2 , 6 , 7, "foo", 4 , 5, 6, 7]
results = list(unfold(test, (values, [], 0)))[-1]
print results

Output: [1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 6, 7, 2, 6, 7, 6, 7]

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