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I have a class with two constructors, one that takes no arguments and one that takes one argument.

Creating objects using the constructor that takes one argument works as expected. However, if I create objects using the constructor that takes no arguments, I get an error.

For instance, if I compile this code (using g++ 4.0.1)...

class Foo
{
  public:
    Foo() {};
    Foo(int a) {};
    void bar() {};
};

int main()
{
  // this works...
  Foo foo1(1);
  foo1.bar();

  // this does not...
  Foo foo2();
  foo2.bar();

  return 0;
}

... I get the following error:

nonclass.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’:
nonclass.cpp:17: error: request for member ‘bar’ in ‘foo2’, which is of non-class type ‘Foo ()()’

Why is this, and how do I make it work?

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related: stackoverflow.com/q/2318650/69537 –  Meysam Aug 6 '12 at 6:24
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3 Answers

up vote 178 down vote accepted
Foo foo2();

change to

Foo foo2;

You get the error because compiler thinks of

Foo foo2()

as of function declaration with name 'foo2' and the return type 'Foo'.

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Ah yes. Thank you! –  sarnesjo May 18 '09 at 12:52
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Just for the records..

It is actually not a solution to your code, but I had the same error message when accessing the method of a class pointed at by myPointerToClass, e.g.

MyClass* myPointerToClass = new MyClass();
myPointerToClass.aMethodOfThatClass();

where

myPointerToClass->aMethodOfThatClass();

would obviously by correct.

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Thank you.. Worked for me.. Upvoted.. :) –  Kameron Mar 22 '13 at 9:49
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Adding to the knowledge base, I got the same error for

if(class_iter->num == *int_iter)

Even though the IDE gave me the correct members for class_iter. Obviously, the problem is that "anything"::iterator doesn't have a member called num so I need to dereference it. Which doesn't work like this:

if(*class_iter->num == *int_iter)

...apparently. I eventually solved it with this:

if((*class_iter)->num == *int_iter)

I hope this helps someone who runs across this question the way I did.

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