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Dealing with classes (nested etc) does not look easy in Python, surprisingly! The following problem appeared to me recently and took several hours (try, search ...) without success. I read most of SO related links but none of them has pointed the issue presented here!

#------------------------------------
class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 'a'
        print self.a

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        self.b = 'b'
        A.a = 'a_b'
        print self.b, A.a
#------------------------------------
class C:
    class A:
        def __init__(self):
            self.a = 'a'
            print self.a

    class B(A):
        def __init__(self):
            self.b = 'b'
            A.a = 'a_b'
            print self.b, A.a
#------------------------------------
#------------------------------------
>>> c1 = A()
a
>>> c1.a
'a'
>>> c2 = B()
b 
>>> c2.a, c2.b
('a_b', 'b')
>>> c3 = C()
>>> c4 = c3.A()
a
>>> c4.a
'a'
>>> c5 = c3.B()
b a_b
>>> c5.b
'b'
>>> c5.a
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
AttributeError: B instance has no attribute 'a'

Where is the problem in the code? AND In both cases it seems that when B(A) is initialized A() is not initialized. What is the solution for this issue? Note that the term A.__init__() being called inside B()'s __init__() does not work!

Updates:

class Geometry:
    class Curve:
        def __init__(self,c=1):
            self.c = c                          #curvature parameter
            print 'Curvature %g'%self.c
            pass                                #some codes

    class Line(Curve):
        def __init__(self):
            Geometry.Curve.__init__(self,0)     #the key point
            pass                                #some codes

g = Geometry()
C = g.Curve(0.5)
L = g.Line()

which results in:

Curvature 0.5
Curvature 0

what I was looking for.

share|improve this question
1  
"... A.__init__() being called inside B()'s __init__() does not work!" Pics or it didn't happen. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 8 '12 at 4:03
    
ditto. how did your call of A.__init__() in B.__init__() look like? –  soulcheck Jan 8 '12 at 4:19
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams The solution for the problem now is found. That's great just after a few hours. You can find your point in the update section of the question. –  Developer Jan 8 '12 at 8:01
    
@soulcheck see my comment above for Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams. –  Developer Jan 8 '12 at 8:01
    
@Supporter it would be much simpler if instead of the outer Geometry class you just created a module called 'geometry'. Then you get exactly the same grouping but without the complications of the nested class: import geometry as g c = g.Curve(0.5) l = g.Line() –  Duncan Jan 8 '12 at 13:48
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The code executed in a method runs in the local scope of that method. If you access an object that is not in this scope, Python will look it up in the global/module scope, NOT in the class scope or the scope of any enclosing class!

This means that:

A.a = 'a_b'

inside C.B.__init__ will set the class attribute of the global A class, not C.A as you probably intended. For that you would have to do this:

C.A.a = 'a_b'

Also, Python will not call parent methods if you override them in subclasses. You have to do it yourself.

The scoping rules mean that if you wanted to call the __init__ method of the parent class inside C.B.__init__, it has to look like this:

C.A.__init__(self)

and NOT like this:

A.__init__(self)

which is probably what you've tried.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I could solve the problem with your key point of scoping rules. The full solution was added as updates. –  Developer Jan 8 '12 at 7:58
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Nested classes seems so unpythonic, even if considered as factories. But to answer your question: There simply is no c5.a (instance of C.B). In the init-method of C.B you add to the CLASS C.A an attribute a, but not to C.B! The class A does already have an attribute a, if instantiated! But the object of class B (and even the class) doesn't!

You must also keep in mind, that __init__ is not an constructor like in C++ or Java! The "real constructor" in python would be __new__. __init__ just initializes the instance of a class!

class A:
    c = 'class-attribute'
    def __init__(self):
        self.i = 'instance-attribute'

So in this example c is a class-attribute, where i is an attribute of the instance.

Even more curios, is your attempt to add an attribute to the baseclass at the moment of the instantiation of the child-class. You are not getting a "late" inheritance-attribute that way. You simply add to the class A an additional attribute, which surprises me to even work. I guess you are using python 3.x?

The reason for this behaviour? Well, i guess it has to do with pythons neat feature that in python definitions are executed(AFAIK).

The same reason why:

def method(lst = []):

is almost ever a bad idea. the deafult-parameter gets bound at the moment of the definition and you won't generate a new list-object every-time you call the method, but reusing the same list-object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. As you can see in update section of the question, sometime nested classes make the programming more structured and easy to handle. –  Developer Jan 8 '12 at 8:09
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