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How could I make the 'request' module in Node.js load things in a synchronous fashion? The best advice I've seen is to somehow use the callback to get the function to not return itself until it is done. I am trying to use the 'request' function inline in code (things need to be processed based on that data that can't be placed in callbacks).

So how could I use the callback of the 'request' module to keep it from returning itself until it is finished with loading the resource?

What I'm doing is running a loop that downloads two values from an API, and then has to do some math based on those values. While the math could be done in callbacks... the loop would advance without the values it needs to perform the next operation. (So stopping the loop from advancing until the data is ready would solve the issue)

    /* loop */ {
         /* URL Generation */


    request( {url: base + u_ext}, function( err, res, body ) {
        var split1 = body.split("\n");
        var split2 = split1[1].split(", ");
        ucomp = split2[1];
    });

    request( {url: base + v_ext}, function( err, res, body ) {
        var split1 = body.split("\n");
        var split2 = split1[1].split(", ");
        vcomp = split2[1];
    });

    /* math which needs to be after functions get variables and before loop advances */
    }
share|improve this question
    
Can you show some code? I believe anything synchronous can be done in asynchronous fashion, but not vice-versa. –  awfullyjohn Jan 8 '12 at 4:23
    
yeah, theres some pseudocode. –  Kyle Hotchkiss Jan 8 '12 at 4:35
    
possible duplicate of Synchronous request in nodejs –  msanford Jan 6 '14 at 16:33
    
this question is from 2 years ago, and has an answer here. –  Kyle Hotchkiss Jan 7 '14 at 16:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The short answer is: don't. If you want code that reads linearly, use a library like seq. But just don't expect synchronous. You really can't. And that's a good thing.

There's little or nothing that can't be put in a callback. If they depend on common variables, create a closure to contain them. What's the actual task at hand?

You'd want to have a counter, and only call the callback when the data is there:

var waiting = 2;
request( {url: base + u_ext}, function( err, res, body ) {
    var split1 = body.split("\n");
    var split2 = split1[1].split(", ");
    ucomp = split2[1];
    if(--waiting == 0) callback();
});

request( {url: base + v_ext}, function( err, res, body ) {
    var split1 = body.split("\n");
    var split2 = split1[1].split(", ");
    vcomp = split2[1];
    if(--waiting == 0) callback();
});

function callback() {
    // do math here.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Running a loop that has to download two different values from an API and act upon them. The math could be done in callbacks... but than the loop would move forward without the data that was calculated in callbacks, which kinda brings a new issue up. –  Kyle Hotchkiss Jan 8 '12 at 4:05
    
Edited my answer to explain one technique. –  Aredridel Jan 8 '12 at 5:19

You should take a look at library called async

and try to use async.series call for your problem.

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Aredridels answer is relatively good (upvoted it), but I think it lacks the loop equivalent. This should help you:

Sync code equivalent:

while (condition) {
  var data = request(url);
  <math here>
}
return result;

Async code for serial execution:

function continueLoop() {
  if (!condition) return cb(result);
  request(url, function(err, res, body) {
    <math here>
    continueLoop()
  })
}
continueLoop()
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Though asynchronous style may be the nature of node.js and generally you should not do this, there are some times you want to do this.

I'm writing a handy script to check an API and want not to mess it up with callbacks.

Javascript cannot execute synchronous requests, but C libraries can.

https://github.com/dhruvbird/http-sync

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1  
Finally - Async is great, but callback hell awaited those who need sequential requests whose urls depended on the last response. Try making several hundred HTTP requests asynchronously! Thanks, I'll be spreading the word on this one. –  Kyle Hotchkiss Jun 20 '12 at 13:55

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