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I have a table as below and I would like to know if I can still join them together, without losing existing data from both tables when they are combined by referencing JOIN methods.

Table details - VIEW Table

SELECT
  r.domainid,
  r.DomainStart,
  r.Domain_End,
  r.ddid,
  r.confid,
  r.pdbcode,
  r.chainid,
  d.pdbcode AS "CATH_PDBCODE",
  d.cathbegin AS "CATH_BEGIN",
  d.cathend AS "CATH_END"
FROM dyndom_domain_table r
  JOIN cath_domains d ON d.pdbcode::character(4) = r.pdbcode 
  ORDER BY confid ASC;

As you can see, dyndom_domain_table is a VIEW Table that I have created to make it easier for me to use JOIN clauses with the other table that has the same pdbcode.

So far it just returns all of the data that matches with the PDB Code. What I would like to do is return all of the data that both matches and doesn't match each other's PDB Code.

Is there a rule in which I can apply it to? Or is it not possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe you want a FULL OUTER JOIN rather than just a JOIN (which is, by default, an INNER JOIN). In a FULL OUTER JOIN, every row in each table will correspond to some row in the result table; rows from one table that don't match the other will be extended with NULLs to fill the missing column.

So FULL OUTER JOIN instead of just JOIN, and that should do you.

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Thank you very much for the explanation. It did work. Returns all of the rows eventhough they do and don't match. –  Jeiman Jan 8 '12 at 16:17

I think you're asking for a left join, but I'm not sure.

SELECT
  r.domainid,
  r.DomainStart,
  r.Domain_End,
  r.ddid,
  r.confid,
  r.pdbcode,
  r.chainid,
  d.pdbcode AS "CATH_PDBCODE",
  d.cathbegin AS "CATH_BEGIN",
  d.cathend AS "CATH_END"
FROM dyndom_domain_table r
  LEFT JOIN cath_domains d ON d.pdbcode::character(4) = r.pdbcode 
  ORDER BY confid ASC;
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Depends, I guess. A LEFT JOIN will drop data from the second table if it doesn't match any data from the first table. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jan 8 '12 at 4:28
3  
Well, I think we agree on one thing. He seems to mean an outer join. :) –  Wes Freeman Jan 8 '12 at 4:29

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