Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a Python extension for a C library. I have a data structure that looks like this:

typedef struct _mystruct{
   double * clientdata;
   size_t   len;
} MyStruct;

The purpose of this datatype maps directly to the list data type in Python. I therefore, want to create 'list-like' behavior for the exported struct, so that code written using my C extension is more 'Pythonic'.

In particular, this is what I want to be able to do (from python code) Note: py_ctsruct is a ctsruct datatype being accessed in python.

My requirements can be sumarized as:

  1. list(py_ctsruct) returns a python list with all contents copied out from the c struct
  2. py_cstruct[i] returns ith element (preferably throws IndexError on invalid index)
  3. for elem in py_ctsruct: ability to enumerate

According to PEP234, An object can be iterated over with "for" if it implements _iter_() or _getitem_(). Using that logic then, I think that by adding the following attributes (via rename) to my SWIG interface file, I will have the desired behavior (apart from req. #1 above - which I still dont know how to achieve):

__len__
__getitem__
__setitem__

I am now able to index the C object in python. I have not yet implemented the Python exception throwing, however if array bounds are exceeded, are return a magic number (error code).

The interesting thing is that when I attempt to iterate over the struct using 'for x in' syntax for example:

for i in py_cstruct:
    print i

Python enters into an infinite loop that simply prints the magic (error) number mentioned above, on the console. which suggests to me that there is something wrong with the indexing.

last but not the least, how can I implement requirement 1? this involves (as I understand it):

  • handling' the function call list() from python
  • Returning a Python (list) data type from C code

[[Update]]

I would be interested in seeing a little code snippet on what (if any) declarations I need to put in my interface file, so that I can iterate over the elements of the c struct, from Python.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+50

The simplest solution to this is to implement __getitem__ and throw an IndexError exception for an invalid index.

I put together an example of this, using %extend and %exception in SWIG to implement __getitem__ and raise an exception respectively:

%module test

%include "exception.i"

%{
#include <assert.h>
#include "test.h"
static int myErr = 0; // flag to save error state
%}

%exception MyStruct::__getitem__ {
  assert(!myErr);
  $action
  if (myErr) {
    myErr = 0; // clear flag for next time
    // You could also check the value in $result, but it's a PyObject here
    SWIG_exception(SWIG_IndexError, "Index out of bounds");
  }
}

%include "test.h"

%extend MyStruct {
  double __getitem__(size_t i) {
    if (i >= $self->len) {
      myErr = 1;
      return 0;
    }
    return $self->clientdata[i];
  }
}

I tested it by adding to test.h:

static MyStruct *test() {
  static MyStruct inst = {0,0};
  if (!inst.clientdata) {
    inst.len = 10;
    inst.clientdata = malloc(sizeof(double)*inst.len);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < inst.len; ++i) {
      inst.clientdata[i] = i;
    }
  }
  return &inst;
}

And running the following Python:

import test

for i in test.test():
  print i

Which prints:

python run.py
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
9.0

and then finishes.


An alternative approach, using a typemap to map MyStruct onto a PyList directly is possible too:

%module test

%{
#include "test.h"
%}

%typemap(out) (MyStruct *) {
  PyObject *list = PyList_New($1->len);
  for (size_t i = 0; i < $1->len; ++i) {
    PyList_SetItem(list, i, PyFloat_FromDouble($1->clientdata[i]));
  }

  $result = list;
}

%include "test.h"

This will create a PyList with the return value from any function that returns a MyStruct *. I tested this %typemap(out) with the exact same function as the previous method.

You can also write a corresponding %typemap(in) and %typemap(freearg) for the reverse, something like this untested code:

%typemap(in) (MyStruct *) {
  if (!PyList_Check($input)) {
    SWIG_exception(SWIG_TypeError, "Expecting a PyList");
    return NULL;
  }
  MyStruct *tmp = malloc(sizeof(MyStruct));
  tmp->len = PyList_Size($input);
  tmp->clientdata = malloc(sizeof(double) * tmp->len);
  for (size_t i = 0; i < tmp->len; ++i) {
    tmp->clientdata[i] = PyFloat_AsDouble(PyList_GetItem($input, i));
    if (PyErr_Occured()) {
      free(tmp->clientdata);
      free(tmp);
      SWIG_exception(SWIG_TypeError, "Expecting a double");
      return NULL;
    }
  }
  $1 = tmp;
}

%typemap(freearg) (MyStruct *) {
  free($1->clientdata);
  free($1);
}

Using an iterator would make more sense for containers like linked lists, but for completeness sake here's how you might go about doing it for MyStruct with __iter__. The key bit is that you get SWIG to wrap another type for you, which provides the __iter__() and next() needed, in this case MyStructIter which is defined and wrapped at the same time using %inline since it's not part of the normal C API:

%module test

%include "exception.i"

%{
#include <assert.h>
#include "test.h"
static int myErr = 0;
%}

%exception MyStructIter::next {
  assert(!myErr);
  $action
  if (myErr) {
    myErr = 0; // clear flag for next time
    PyErr_SetString(PyExc_StopIteration, "End of iterator");
    return NULL;
  }
}

%inline %{
  struct MyStructIter {
    double *ptr;
    size_t len;
  };
%}

%include "test.h"

%extend MyStructIter {
  struct MyStructIter *__iter__() {
    return $self;
  }

  double next() {
    if ($self->len--) {
      return *$self->ptr++;
    }
    myErr = 1;
    return 0;
  }
}

%extend MyStruct {
  struct MyStructIter __iter__() {
    struct MyStructIter ret = { $self->clientdata, $self->len };
    return ret;
  }
}

The requirements for iteration over containers are such that the container needs to implement __iter__() and return a new iterator, but in addition to next() which returns the next item and increments the iterator the iterator itself must also supply a __iter__() method. This means that either the container or an iterator can be used identically.

MyStructIter needs to keep track of the current state of iteration - where we are and how much we have left. In this example I did that by keeping a pointer to the next item and a counter that we use to tell when we hit the end. You could also have kept track of the sate by keeping a pointer to the MyStruct the iterator is using and a counter for the position within that, something like:

%inline %{
  struct MyStructIter {
    MyStruct *list;
    size_t pos;
  };
%}

%include "test.h"

%extend MyStructIter {
  struct MyStructIter *__iter__() {
    return $self;
  }

  double next() {
    if ($self->pos < $self->list->len) {
      return $self->list->clientdata[$self->pos++];
    }
    myErr = 1;
    return 0;
  }
}

%extend MyStruct {
  struct MyStructIter __iter__() {
    struct MyStructIter ret = { $self, 0 };
    return ret;
  }
}

(In this instance we could actually have just used the container itself as the iterator as an iterator, by supplying an __iter__() that returned a copy of the container and a next() similar to the first type. I didn't do that in my original answer because I thought that would be less clear than have two distinct types - a container and an iterator for that container)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the snippets. Quick question, did you test this from the Python end?. I dont know much about typemaps and PyList/PyTuple but I suspect that they are closer to what I would like to achive (i.e. treat the C struct as a Python sequence type). The main point also however, is that my main problem is that I am not able to iterate over the elements in the C struct. perhaps exposing the C struct as a list or tuple helps kill two birds (iteration and array bounds checking). Those are the two problems I am trying to solve - is typemap + PyList the way forward?. What do you think? –  Homunculus Reticulli Jan 12 '12 at 0:27
    
@HomunculusReticulli - I tested everything from the Python side, using the test() function I showed, although for the typemaps I only tested the %typemap(out) though, but both methods worked fine with the for i in ... Python construct. –  Flexo Jan 12 '12 at 0:49
    
@HomunculusReticulli - I also added the __iter__() variant to my answer although I much prefer the __getitem__() version in this instance. –  Flexo Jan 12 '12 at 0:58
    
+1 for the useful snippets and detailed explanation so far. I have 3 questions relating to the code. 1. Can you please explain how iteration works with only getitem method implemented. What goes on behind the scenes?. 2 I modified the getitem method to enforce positive integer indexing - yet when I test with a negative index, I get an OverFlowError NOT an IndexError - Why? 3. The MyStructIter has the EXACT SAME fields as MyStruct which it iterates over. Is this a requirement of iterator structs? –  Homunculus Reticulli Jan 12 '12 at 9:38
    
@HomunculusReticulli 1 - only __getitem__() which throws an IndexError exception is required for the for loop to work. 2 - __getitem__ in my example takes a size_t as the index. This is unsigned so can't ever be negative on the C side. If SWIG spots that it's negative on the Python side it will raise an exception, rather than doing the clumsy unsigned i = -1 that would just give you a very large number. Try ssize_t instead for a signed version. 3 - it's not a requirement, but I thought it was the easiest way in this case. I'll make an edit explaining more. –  Flexo Jan 12 '12 at 11:17
  1. Look up using the %typemap swig command. http://www.swig.org/Doc2.0/SWIGDocumentation.html#Typemaps http://www.swig.org/Doc2.0/SWIGDocumentation.html#Typemaps_nn25 The memberin typemap might do what you want. http://www.swig.org/Doc2.0/SWIGDocumentation.html#Typemaps_nn35 I have a typemap that I found in the Python section that allows me to transfer char** data into the C++ as a list of Python strings. I would guess there would be similar functionality.
  2. Also, you can define %pythoncode in your interface inside the struct inside the swig "i" file. This will allow you to add python methods in the object that gets created for the struct. There is another command %addmethod (I think) that allows you to add methods to the struct or a class as well. Then you can create methods for indexing the objects in C++ or C if you want. There are a lot of ways to solve this.

For an interface I am working on I used a class object that has some methods for accessing the data in my code. Those methods are written in C++. Then I used the %pythoncode directive inside the class inside of the "i" file and created "getitem" and "setitem" methods in Python code that uses the expose C++ methods to make it look like a dictionary style access.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the %pythoncode suggestion. It allowed me to implement some other functionality (accessing object properties). I am still not able to iterate (sensibly) over my C structs in Python though. –  Homunculus Reticulli Jan 8 '12 at 11:36
    
I think you need to typemap the data in the struct. I included some links. The memberin function might do what you are thinking. You may need to write some C code functions that manipulate the array of objects and use those functions inside the %pythoncode methods. Let me know if you need more ideas. –  Demolishun Jan 8 '12 at 21:07

You say you have yet to implement Python exception throwing - that's the problem. From PEP 234:

A new exception is defined, StopIteration, which can be used to signal the end of an iteration.

You must set this exception at the end of your iteration. Since your code doesn't do this, you're running into the situation you've described:

  1. The interpreter loops through your list's custom iternext function
  2. Your function gets to the end of the array, and rather than correctly setting the StopIteration exception, simply returns your 'magic number'.
  3. The interpreter, seeing no good reason to stop iterating, simply continues to print the value returned by iternext... your magic number. To the interpreter, it's just yet another list member.

Fortunately, this is a pretty simple fix, though may not seem as straightforward, because C has no exception facility. The Python C API simply uses a global error indicator that you set when an exception situation is raised, and then the API standards dictate you return NULL all the way up the stack to the interpreter, which then looks at the output of PyErr_Occurred() to see if an error is set, and if it is, prints the relevant exception and traceback.

So in your function, when you reach the end of the array, you just need this:

PyErr_SetString(PyExc_StopIteration,"End of list");
return NULL;

Here's another great answer for further reading on this issue: How to create a generator/iterator with the Python C API?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.