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I have a Person table. Each person can have many names in the PersonNames table. I would like to get for each person, 2 of his first names and 2 of his last names in one row. like this:

PersonId | FName1 | Fname2  | Lname1    | Lname2
1          David    Daniekl   Bekernman   Stivens

Person table:

   PersonId
   BirthDate

PersonNames table:

   PersonId
   NameId
   Name
   NameType (e.g; first, last...)

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
How are Person and PersonNames related? Is there a PersonId in PersonNames that you've not shown? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 8 '12 at 9:08
    
Yes there is a PersonId in personNames. –  Itay.B Jan 8 '12 at 9:22
    
Can you give us the example PersonNames table for your Person? –  Wes Freeman Jan 8 '12 at 9:35
1  
And what variety of SQL? MySQL, MS SQL Server, Oracle, SQLite, etc? –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 9:53
    
MS SQL. Thanks. –  Itay.B Jan 8 '12 at 10:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this with a little detour through a XML column.

;with P(PersonID, Names) as 
(
  select PersonID,
         (select NameType as '@NameType',
                 Name as '*'
          from PersonNames as PN 
          where PN.PersonId = P.PersonId
          for xml path('Name'), type)
  from Person as P
)
select P.PersonID,
       P.Names.value('(/Name[@NameType = "first"])[1]', 'varchar(100)') as FName1,
       P.Names.value('(/Name[@NameType = "last"])[1]', 'varchar(100)') as LName1,
       P.Names.value('(/Name[@NameType = "first"])[2]', 'varchar(100)') as FName2,
       P.Names.value('(/Name[@NameType = "last"])[2]', 'varchar(100)') as LName2
from P

Try here: http://data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/q/123608/

share|improve this answer
    
Why the XML, and not just a straight MAX() [my answer] or a PIVOT [AndriyM's answer]? Are there peformance characterisitic differences? –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 18:28
    
@Dems - I just wanted to show a different way to get the job done. I have not tested this for performance so I really don't know. It really depends on the number of rows returned. The where clause should to filter rows should be applied in the CTE for best performance. I would not recommend to make this query in to a view and use that in joins etc. It would probably generate the entire CTE for every question regardless if one row is output or all rows. If performance is an issue I would recommend to do a straight query and the pivot on the client for presentation. –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 8 '12 at 18:40
    
@Dems BTW. This solution is very similar to the popular for xml path trick to concatenate rows in to comma separated strings. –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 8 '12 at 18:43
    
@Dems - I looked a bit on both yours and AndriyM's answer and both get the job done in a single table scan. Without a where clause that is a good as it gets. +1 to you both. –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 8 '12 at 18:54
1  
@MikaelEriksson: I wished I could have as much discerning with your answer as you had with mine! For me, your answer is primarily useful because it contains a correctly working solution that uses XML, a thing that I know poorly at the moment. Being rather lazy to learn by extensively reading the docs, I'm presently trying to gather as much as possible by looking at various examples. (It is very often with me so that, once there's a basic understanding of the principle in my head, it produces quite a natural desire to obtain more theoretical knowledge on the matter.) –  Andriy M Jan 8 '12 at 19:41

If this is specifically for just two names, this will pick up the names with the MIN and MAX NameId per Person...

SELECT
  Person.PersonId,
  MAX(CASE WHEN Name.nameId = map.minNameId AND Name.nameType = 'first' THEN Name.Name ELSE NULL END) AS fname1,
  MAX(CASE WHEN Name.nameId = map.minNameId AND Name.nameType = 'last'  THEN Name.Name ELSE NULL END) AS lname1,
  MAX(CASE WHEN Name.nameId = map.maxNameId AND Name.nameType = 'first' THEN Name.Name ELSE NULL END) AS fname2,
  MAX(CASE WHEN Name.nameId = map.maxNameId AND Name.nameType = 'last'  THEN Name.Name ELSE NULL END) AS lname2
FROM
  Person
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT personId, MIN(nameId) AS minNameId, MAX(nameId) as maxNameId FROM PersonNames GROUP BY PersonId) AS map
    ON map.PersonId = Person.PersonId
LEFT JOIN
  PersonNames AS Name
    On Name.PersonId = Person.PersonId
GROUP BY
  Person.PersonId


EDIT

Now that I can see that this is MS SQL Server, there is another option. Similar to others here, but possibly slightly simpler...

WITH
  sequenced_names AS
(
  SELECT
    DENSE_RANK() OVER (PARTITION BY PersonId ORDER BY NameID) AS NameOrdinal,
    *
  FROM
    PersonNames
)
SELECT
  PersonID,
  MAX(CASE WHEN nameOrdinal = 1 AND nameType = 'first' THEN Name END) AS fname1,
  MAX(CASE WHEN nameOrdinal = 1 AND nameType = 'last'  THEN Name END) AS lname1,
  MAX(CASE WHEN nameOrdinal = 2 AND nameType = 'first' THEN Name END) AS fname2,
  MAX(CASE WHEN nameOrdinal = 2 AND nameType = 'last'  THEN Name END) AS lname2
FROM
  sequenced_names
GROUP BY
  PersonID
share|improve this answer
    
I'm struggling to understand this. You say it's for just two names – for two names per person or for two names of each type per person (i.e. for four names)? The reason for my question is the fact that you are pulling four names in the final select, but you are only mapping exactly two nameIds per personId, irrespectively of nameType. Either I am missing something or there's an oversight on your side. –  Andriy M Jan 8 '12 at 15:39
    
@AndriyM - Two Names (identified by a NameID) composed of two parts (a first name and a last name, identified by NameType). –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 18:17
    
@Dems Beautiful! –  Oleg Dok Jan 8 '12 at 18:54
    
Ah, I can see now the reason of my incomprehension! From the original post, I've gathered that all the (partial) names linked to the same personId constitute a single name. But you seem to view them as (possibly) several names, each pair of one first and one last names constituting a separate alternative name of the associated personId – is that so? –  Andriy M Jan 8 '12 at 19:21
    
@AndriyM - It's my assumption. But it's easily wrong. –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 21:59

One simple way of solving this as I can see it, is to rank every person's names of each type independently with different ranking signs, i.e. for instance, first names with positive rankings, last names with negative ones. Then you pick and pivot names that have rankings of 1, 2, -1, -2. Here's what the query might look like:

WITH ranked AS (
  SELECT
    *,
    rnk =
      CASE NameType WHEN 'first' THEN 1 ELSE -1 END *
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
        PARTITION BY PersonId, NameType
        ORDER BY NameId
      )
  FROM PersonNames
  WHERE NameType IN ('first', 'last')
)
SELECT
  PersonId,
  FName1   = [1],
  FName2   = [2],
  LName1   = [-1],
  LName2   = [-2]
FROM (
  SELECT
    PersonId,
    Name,
    rnk
  FROM ranked
) s
PIVOT (
  MAX(Name) FOR rnk IN ([-2], [-1], [1], [2])
) p

On the other hand, ranking last names from the end might appear more appropriate (at least, I think, I might prefer it better this way). So here's an alternative to the above script which ranks last names from the end:

WITH ranked AS (
  SELECT
    *,
    rnk =
      CASE NameType WHEN 'first' THEN 1 ELSE -1 END *
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
        PARTITION BY PersonId, NameType
        ORDER BY CASE NameType WHEN 'first' THEN 1 ELSE -1 END * NameId
      )
  FROM PersonNames
  WHERE NameType IN ('first', 'last')
),
SELECT
  PersonId,
  FName1   = [1],
  FName2   = [2],
  LName1   = ISNULL([-2], [-1]),
  LName2   = CASE WHEN [-2] IS NULL THEN NULL ELSE [-1] END
FROM (
  SELECT
    PersonId,
    Name,
    rnk
  FROM ranked
) s
PIVOT (
  MAX(Name) FOR rnk IN ([-2], [-1], [1], [2])
) p

You can see that this version is a bit more complicated. For one thing, a change of sign had to be applied to NameId to ensure its sorting in different directions for different types.

Another thing is pulling the final result set. You see, if a person has just two or more last names, the script would display them in the order as they are in the table: the item before the last goes to LName1 and the last item goes to LName2. But in case of exactly one last name my intention was to display it as LName1, and LName2 to be empty (just like the first query would do). Therefore, as you can see, additional measures had to be taken to ensure that order of display.

share|improve this answer

Try this, SQL Server solution,

Assuming there is also PersonId column in table OF names and there is no more than 2 names for each person, else we need subqueries here:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Person]
(
[PersonId] [int] PRIMARY KEY
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[PersonNames]
(
[PersonId] [int] NOT NULL,
[nameId] [int] NOT NULL,
[NAME] [varchar] (100) NOT NULL,
[NameType] [varchar] (10) NOT NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

INSERT Person VALUES(1),(2)

INSERT dbo.PersonNames(PersonId, NameId, Name, NameType)
SELECT 1,1,'John', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 1,1,'Doe', 'last' UNION ALL
SELECT 1,2,'Ioann', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 1,2,'Doeman', 'last' UNION ALL
SELECT 1,3,'Yonh', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 1,3,'Doesson', 'last' UNION ALL

SELECT 2,1,'John2', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 2,1,'Doe2', 'last' UNION ALL
SELECT 2,2,'Ioann2', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 2,2,'Doeman2', 'last' UNION ALL
SELECT 2,3,'Yonh2', 'first' UNION ALL
SELECT 2,3,'Doesson2', 'last' 


SELECT 
    Person.PersonId, 
    FName1.NAME FName1,
    LName1.NAME LName1,
    FName2.NAME FName2,
    LName2.NAME LName2
FROM Person
JOIN (
       SELECT 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY PersonId ORDER BY NameId) Ordinal,
        PersonId, Name, NameId
       FROM PersonNames 
       WHERE  NameType = 'first'
     ) FName1
    ON FName1.PersonId = Person.PersonId AND FName1.Ordinal=1
JOIN PersonNames LName1
    ON LName1.PersonId = FName1.PersonId AND LName1.NameType = 'last' AND FName1.NameId = LName1.NameId
LEFT JOIN 
     (
       SELECT 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY PersonId ORDER BY NameId) Ordinal,
        PersonId, Name, NameId
       FROM PersonNames 
       WHERE  NameType = 'first' 
     ) FName2
    ON FName2.PersonId = Person.PersonId AND FName2.NameId <> FName1.NameId AND FName2.Ordinal = 2
LEFT JOIN PersonNames LName2
    ON FName2.PersonId = LName2.PersonId AND LName2.NameType = 'last' AND LName2.NameId <> LName1.NameId AND FName2.NameId = LName2.NameId

DROP TABLE Person
DROP TABLE dbo.PersonNames
share|improve this answer
    
Very elegant. Wish I had thought of that :) –  amccausl Jan 8 '12 at 9:09
    
If the person has two first names in the table, the first join will find both. This will led to two records with different names in different columns. Also, if the person has more than two first names, the first left join will pick all of them except one, again causing duplication. –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 9:28
1  
Due to the TOP 1, this will now only work for one person in the Person table, and there is no guarantee that the second TOP 1 will be for the same person. –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 9:39
    
This still has the same issues, but now has one more - You can't JOIN on a correlated sub-query. If the variety of SQL has an APPLY operator that could be used in this way... To fix the second issue, order both sub-queries by PersonID, NameID. The "works for only one person" can't be corrected with this layout. –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 9:53
    
Valid for sql server –  Oleg Dok Jan 8 '12 at 10:09

You can use group_concat in mysql to put them in a single row, then your application can determine which to display.

SELECT Person.PersonId
     , GROUP_CONCAT( DISTINCT first_name.Name SEPARATOR ',' ) AS first_names
     , GROUP_CONCAT( DISTINCT last_name.Name SEPARATOR ',' ) AS last_names
FROM Person
LEFT JOIN PersonName first_name ON Person.PersonId = first_name.PersonId AND first_name.Type = 'first'
LEFT JOIN PersonName last_name ON Person.PersonId = last_name.PersonId AND last_name.Type = 'last'
GROUP BY Person.PersonId

You can also use SUBSTRING and LOCATE in SQL to grab the first and second entry in first and last, but the method is rather brittle/complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
NOTE: this assumes MySQL. Also, it has an issue... If there are 2 first names and 2 last names, the two left JOINs will yield 4 records with the different combinations... [ (f1,l1) (f1,l2) (f2,l1) (f2,l2) ] and so cause duplication in the GROUP_CONCAT. –  MatBailie Jan 8 '12 at 10:05
    
Duplication is removed by the 'DISTINCT' keyword –  amccausl Jan 8 '12 at 11:32

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