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I am creating a floating point matrix template class. The class declaration is shown below only with relevant functions and members.

// columns, rows
template <unsigned int c, unsigned int r>
class Matrix {
 public:
  Matrix(float value);

  float& At(unsigned int x, unsigned int y);
  float const& At(unsigned int x, unsigned int y) const;
  template <unsigned int p> Matrix<p, r> MultipliedBy(Matrix<p, c> const& other);

 private:
  // column-major ordering
  float data_[c][r];
}

The implementations for each of the above functions follow.

template <unsigned int c, unsigned int r>
Matrix<c, r>::Matrix(float value) {
  std::fill(&data_[0][0], &data_[c][r], value);
}

template <unsigned int c, unsigned int r>
float& Matrix<c, r>::At(unsigned int x, unsigned int y) {
  if (x >= c || y >= r) {
    return data_[0][0];
  }

  return data_[x][y];
}

template <unsigned int c, unsigned int r>
float const& Matrix<c, r>::At(unsigned int x, unsigned int y) const {
  if (x >= c || y >= r) {
    return data_[0][0];
  }

  return data_[x][y];
}

template <unsigned int c, unsigned int r>
template <unsigned int p>
Matrix<p, r> Matrix<c, r>::MultipliedBy(Matrix<p, c> const& other) {
  Matrix<p, r> result(0.0f);

  for (unsigned int x = 0; x < c; x++) {
    for (unsigned int y = 0; y < r; y++) {
      for (unsigned int z = 0; z < p; z++) {
        result.At(z, y) += At(x, y) * other.At(z, x);
      }
    }
  }

  return result;
}

Now, a few lines of test code.

Matrix<4, 4> m1;

// m1 set to
//
//  1   2   3   4
//  5   6   7   8
//  9   10  11  12
//  13  14  15  16

Matrix<1, 4> m2;

// m2 set to
//
//  6
//  3
//  8
//  9

Matrix<1, 4> m3 = m1.MultipliedBy(m2);

Here's where things get weird. When compiled (using g++) with no optimization (-O0):

// m3 contains
//  0
//  0
//  0
//  0

With any optimization (-O1, -O2, or -O3):

// m3 contains
//  210
//  236
//  262
//  288

Note that even with the optimization, the answer is incorrect (verified with an external calculator). So I narrowed it down to this call in MultipliedBy:

Matrix<p, r> result(0.0f);

If I instantiate result in any way other becomes invalidated (all data_ values set to 0.0f). Before the allocation/initialization of result, other is still valid (6, 3, 8, 9).

It is worth noting that if I multiply two matrices of the same (square) dimension, I get a completely valid and correct output, regardless of the optimization level.

Anyone have a clue what in the world g++ is pulling here? I'm running g++ (GCC) 4.6.1 on mingw... might this have something to do with the problem?

share|improve this question
1  
By the way, your identity matrix is wrong: it should be diag(1), not diag(0). What you call Identity is just Zero. – Vlad Jan 8 '12 at 11:18
    
Shoot, thank you. Linear algebra and late night coding don't mix. I'm editing the post to reflect this. – Hytosys Jan 8 '12 at 11:19
    
What happens when you remove the "const" version of the "At" method. I have a hunch that the compiler is getting confused. Did you try putting print statements on each method to see which version is getting called? – selbie Jan 8 '12 at 11:27
1  
col x row Indexing is a bit confusing, normaly one defines a matrix as rows x cols – P3trus Jan 8 '12 at 11:35
1  
I didn't mean your definition of the 2d array, just meant the ordering of the template parameters. Don't know about OpenGL but in Linear Algebra its rowsxcols. – P3trus Jan 8 '12 at 11:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

&data_[c][r] is perhaps wrong: it's data_ + (c*r + r) * FS, whereas you perhaps need &data_[c-1][r-1] + FS, which is data_ + ((c-1)*r + (r-1) + 1) * FS, which is data_ + c*r * FS.

(Here FS == sizeof(float).)

Your last item is data_[c-1][r-1], so one past last would be data_[c-1][r], not data_[c][r].

share|improve this answer
    
A classic example of overlooking simple matters... Thank you very much! – Hytosys Jan 8 '12 at 11:36
    
@Hytosys: You are welcome! – Vlad Jan 8 '12 at 11:40

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