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I"m trying to find a way to tell if a type is a pointer at compile time. That is something like this:

#include <type_traits>
#if std::is_pointer<char*>::value
#pragma message("blah")
#endif

However, this gives "warning C4067: unexpected tokens following preprocessor directive - expected a newline" twice (I think the :: is what confuses it) and it doesn't print blah. When I hoover over ::value the compiler tells me if it's true, which means it's known at compile time so this should work.

The reason for this is that I want to be able to do something like this:

T pHead;
#if std::is_pointer<T>::value
pHead= NULL;
#endif

where I NULL the variable if it's a pointer. It has to be a compile time check because if T is a struct I cannot assign NULL to its variable. I.e. the following code won't compile when T is a struct:

T pHead;
if (std::is_pointer<T>::value)
    pHead= NULL;

Thanks
Matt

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can initialize the variable to its default value, which is NULL for a pointer type.

T pHead = T();

Works for most structs as well.

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I think T is a generic. I doubt this will work. What if T is int*? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 8 '12 at 11:30
    
I saw T as a template parameter or a typedef. If it is then it will work. If it actually is int* we know it is a pointer and can set it to NULL. –  Bo Persson Jan 8 '12 at 11:34
    
@Matt - If you have typedef int* T; it does work. As does a struct or a template parameter. –  Bo Persson Jan 8 '12 at 12:05
    
As Luchian pointed out, T is generic so it could be a int* or struct so this wouldn't work. –  Matt Jan 8 '12 at 12:05
    
Sorry, you are right, after testing it does appear to work, I assumed that since int*() doesn't work T() wouldn't work as well . But now why does it work? If int*() doesn't work why would T() when T instantiates as int* work? –  Matt Jan 8 '12 at 12:19
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You can use templates for this:

template<typename A>
void foo(A a)
{

}

template<typename A>
void foo(A*& a)
{
   a = NULL;
}

Calling foo with a pointer type will enter the second function, otherwise the first one.

You can't do it with preprocessor directives, because, as the name suggests, that happens before compilation.

But template resolution happens during compilation, so you can use this solution.

I'm assuming you're already using templates since your code also provides a generic type:

T pHead;
#if std::is_pointer<T>::value
pHead= NULL;
#endif

you could use

T pHead;
foo(pHead);
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Or he can use boost::is_pointer. –  elmo Jan 8 '12 at 11:34
    
It should be void foo(A*& a). –  Georg Fritzsche Jan 8 '12 at 11:35
    
@GeorgFritzsche you're right, I edited my answer. Thanks! –  Luchian Grigore Jan 8 '12 at 11:37
    
@elmo I'm guessing that basically applies the same concept, right? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 8 '12 at 11:38
1  
@Matt - It is not template specialization, just two overloaded functions that happen to be templates. –  Bo Persson Jan 8 '12 at 12:17
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