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in my ksh script I need to calculate only integer numbers

Sometimes I get float numbers such as 3.49 or 4.8...etc

so I need to translate the float numbers to integer’s numbers according to the following rules (examples)

3.49     will be 3
2.9      will be 3
4.1      will be 4
23.51    will be 24
982.4999 will be 982

10.5     will be 11  ( this example if float is .5 then it will roundup )

Please advice how to do this in ksh or awk or perl

Or

any other language that can be run in my ksh script

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You did not give an "rules", just examples. And they leave the obvious question unanswered, namely, how to round when the decimal part is .500 ? –  tadmc Jan 8 '12 at 15:51
    
THX for your remark see my update question –  Eytan Jan 8 '12 at 20:17
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

After a brief google session, I found that printf seems to be able to do the job, at least in bash (couldn't find an online interpreter that does ksh).

printf "%0.f\n" 4.51
5
printf "%0.f\n" 4.49
4

Code at: http://ideone.com/nEFYF

Note: perl might be overkill, like Marius says, but here's a perl way:

The perl module Math::Round seems to handle the job.

One-liner:

perl -MMath::Round -we 'print round $ARGV[0]' 12.49

Script:

use v5.10;
use Math::Round;
my @list = (3.49, 2.9, 4.1, 23.51, 982.4999);

say round $_ for @list;

Script output:

3
3
4
24
982
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Using printf is really cool. +1 :) –  JS웃 Jan 8 '12 at 18:29
    
Why not just use printf "%0.f\n", $_ for @list; with Perl? –  flesk Jan 9 '12 at 14:13
    
@flesk That'd be perl -nwe 'printf "%0.f\n", $_' perhaps. Using printf directly is shorter, and handles one argument at the time, which sounded like what the OP wanted. –  TLP Jan 9 '12 at 15:07
    
@TLP: I didn't even notice your Perl one-liner. If I had, I'd have suggested you replace it with perl -e 'printf"%0.f\n",shift' 12.49. What I meant was why use Math::Round for such a simple task, when Perl's printf behaves exactly like the C equivalent in your shell example? –  flesk Jan 10 '12 at 8:26
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In awk you can use the int() function to truncate the values of a floating point number to make it integer.

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat f
3.49     will be 3
2.9      will be 3
4.1      will be 4
23.51    will be 24
982.4999 will be 982

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '{x=int($1); print $0,x}' f
3.49     will be 3 3
2.9      will be 3 2
4.1      will be 4 4
23.51    will be 24 23
982.4999 will be 982 982

To Round off you can do something like this -

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk '{x=$1+0.5; y=int(x); print $0,y}' f
3.49     will be 3 3
2.9      will be 3 3
4.1      will be 4 4
23.51    will be 24 24
982.4999 will be 982 982

Note: I am not sure how you would like to handle numbers like 2.5. The above method will return 3 for 2.5.

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The point was to round up or down, not truncate. –  TLP Jan 8 '12 at 11:43
    
Aah, my bad … so what should the value be if it is 2.5? –  JS웃 Jan 8 '12 at 11:45
    
You would have to ask the OP. Math::Round seems to round "towards infinity", i.e. positive numbers up, negative numbers down. –  TLP Jan 8 '12 at 11:47
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Versions of ksh that do non-integer math probably have floor(), trunc(), and round() functions. Can't check 'em all, but at least on my Mac (Lion), I get this:

$ y=3.49
$ print $(( round(y) ))
3
$ y=3.51
$ print $(( round(y) ))
4
$ (( p = round(y) ))
$ print $p
4
$
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In perl, my $i = int($f+0.5);. Should be similar in the other, assuming they have a convert to integer or floor function. Or, if like in javascript, they have a Math.round function which could be used directly.

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how to run this perl syntax in ksh script ? –  Eytan Jan 8 '12 at 11:30
    
ROUNDED=$(perl -e 'print int($ARGV[0] + 0.5)' $REALVALUE) would accomplish this in the script –  Petesh Jan 8 '12 at 11:31
    
For bash, you can go to linuxconfig.org/Bash_scripting_Tutorial and search for "Round floating point number" and find a solution that utilize printf for the same. Probably similar in ksh. –  Marius Kjeldahl Jan 8 '12 at 11:34
1  
Invoking perl for doing this might be considered overkill... –  Marius Kjeldahl Jan 8 '12 at 11:34
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