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Suppose I have an ArrayList containing Object[]{"Hello",10,abitmap} at index 0 and Object[]{"How are you?",20,bbitmap} at index 1

How can I get for example "Hello" from index 0? How can I replace 20 by 15in index 1?

How can I fill all the third columns in the ArrayList by cbitmap using Collections.fill for example?

Thanks for your help.

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2  
Any reason why you don't encapsulate your Object[] in a class? –  fge Jan 8 '12 at 11:55
    
He simply wants to have a dynamic two-dimensional array. :) –  DejanLekic Jan 8 '12 at 11:57
    
@DejanLekic sure, but as the sample shows (type-wise) identical arrays for both elements... –  fge Jan 8 '12 at 11:58
    
@fge: My understanding was that he wants to keep it simple. I do not think that you are wrong. Your suggestion is correct. :) –  DejanLekic Jan 8 '12 at 12:14
    
@DejanLekic for some definition of "simple" ;) Off-by-one errors in array offsets are a frequent source of bugs :p –  fge Jan 8 '12 at 12:18
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of having an Object [], create an inner class, such as:

private class ImageObject{
     private String name;
     private int size; 
     private BufferedImage bitmap;

  public ImageObject(String name, int size, BufferedImage bitmap){
     this.name = name;
     this.size = size;
     this.bitmap = bitmap;
  }

  public String getName(){ 
     return name; 
  }

  public int getSize(){ 
     return size; 
  }

  public BufferedImage getBitmap(){ 
     return bitmap; 
  }

  public void setName(String name){ 
     this.name = name; 
  }

  public void setSize(int size){ 
     this.size = size; 
  }

  public void setBitmap(BufferedImage bitmap){ 
     this.bitmap = bitmap; 
  }
}

Then, create your ArrayList like this:
ArrayList<ImageObject> objects = new ArrayList<ImageObject>();

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1  
Thanks for your help. –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 12:44
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Sorry if I'm rough (or wrong) but it seems that you've not modelize in the right way. Even if you can easily do what you need to do, I would recommend you to think things in another way.

That is, an OO way.

Instead of storing heterogenous things in an generic array, let's create a class that hold your three information with the according structure and semantic.

class MyStuff {
   private String name;
   private int anInt;
   private List bitmap; //WARN ::  here I guess that it would be preferable to have something else like an Image object, or a stream, or ...

   MyStuff() {}

   //GETTERS AND SETTERS
}

Now, update properties is trivial, and retrieve them too actually.

And to have all of 'em in a List, you will have the convenience to use Generics

List<MyStuff> myStuffs = new ArrayList();
myStuffs.add(...);
myStuffs.add(...);

myStuffs.get(0).setAnInt(4)
myStuffs.get(0).setName("newName")
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Too bad Java does not have value types. :( With your "MyStuff" class lots has to be done in order to become a "good java" class - fields made private, accessors, etc... Compare that OO overhead with simple 2D array of Objects... –  DejanLekic Jan 8 '12 at 12:06
    
You're right, the code show is reduced to the minimal to explain my thoughts and give an orientation. Fort the overhead, I agree but still that when you do java, try to do OO otherwise you won't have the right tools to have a clean and sustainable code. If those triples must be used in several flows, you'll be almost stucked with no semantic around your Object[]. And finally, even if I was doin' C I'd have created a struct... –  andy petrella Jan 8 '12 at 12:13
    
That is why i originally said that it is too bad that Java does not having a value-type (C struct is a value type)... I would make it a C struct too. Simply put, i find writing accessors for a type that is clearly perfect to be a value type as an overhead. But we are offtopic here I guess. :) –  DejanLekic Jan 8 '12 at 12:17
    
Thanks for your help. –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 12:18
    
Actually, since I'm moving to newer/hype new technologies, I can see that almost everyones agree with the fact that accessors are cumbersome. So scala hasn't, playframework (even w/ java) doesn't need POJO but recommend public fields. As I do often now :/ –  andy petrella Jan 8 '12 at 12:21
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How can I get for example "Hello" from index 0?

Object hello = myArray.get(0)[0];

How can I replace 20 by 15 in index 1?

myArray.get(1)[1] = new Integer(15);
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Thanks for your help. –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 12:51
    
how can I fill the first column for example with "Good" in all indexes? Do I have to use a list iterator, or is there a way with Collections.fill? –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 21:13
    
I've found it. For those who may search the same thing : ListIterator iterator = array.listIterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()){ Object[] object = (Object[]) iterator.next(); object[3] = 0; iterator.set(object); } –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 21:32
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Answers to your questions put into code:

ArrayList<Object[]> list = new ArrayList<Object[]>();
list.add(new Object[]{"Hello",10,abitmap});
list.add(new Object[]{"How are you?",20,bbitmap});

Object hello = list.get(0)[0];   // get the first item of the first list entry
System.out.println(hello);

list.get(1)[1] = 15;             // set the second item of the second list entry
System.out.println(list.get(1)[1]);

Please consider also to build a custom class as others suggested in the comments.

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Thanks for your help. –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 12:26
    
how can I fill the first column for example with "Good" in all indexes? Do I have to use a list iterator, or is there a way with Collections.fill? –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 21:13
    
I've found it. For those who may search the same thing : ListIterator iterator = array.listIterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()){ Object[] object = (Object[]) iterator.next(); object[3] = 0; iterator.set(object); } –  Samet Jan 8 '12 at 21:31
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