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This should be very simple, but I cannot find the correct syntax using search.

I have:

SELECT distinct name, id FROM table1 WHERE length<6;

I want to return the id's and names of all distinct names (not distinct ids, since thats an auto increment anyway), but this query is currently returning all names and ids, not just the distinct names...

What's the correct way to do this?

Edit: Length is another columns name and not relevant specifically here.

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1  
What are you expecting with the "length < 6" qualifier... length of a name, is it another column in the table, or just 6 distinct names where you would otherwise just be using a "LIMIT 6" –  DRapp Jan 8 '12 at 12:57
1  
so if you had a ID=1 with name 'john smith' and an ID=7 with name 'john smith' you would want to see john smith once... would you care what ID is returned? Lets be more precise... So if using the above the following were returned would it be acceptable: 7 john smith. Even though there is also a 1 john smith –  xQbert Jan 8 '12 at 13:00
    
@drapp - it is another column. @ xQbert - the first id to appear in the table for that name... –  David19801 Jan 8 '12 at 13:06
    
Then either ypercube's 3rd or Michael's responses should work for you. –  xQbert Jan 8 '12 at 13:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So it sounds like you want distinct names, and any associated id. DISTINCT will return distinct rows as combinations of the selected columns, and since id is auto-increment, that means all rows. Instead use an aggregate.

This query will return the name, and the first auto-increment id with it:

SELECT
  name, 
  MIN(id) as id
FROM table1
WHERE length < 6
GROUP BY name
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+1 because I think this is the right path; –  xQbert Jan 8 '12 at 13:04
    
@xQbert: OP commented: "it is another column..." –  ypercube Jan 8 '12 at 13:06
    
@ypercube not at the time I had posted. but I fixed it since it was w/in 5 min :D –  xQbert Jan 8 '12 at 13:10

Distinct names:

SELECT DISTINCT name 
FROM table1 
WHERE length < 6

Distinct names and all their ids:

SELECT name, GROUP_CONCAT(id) 
FROM table1 
WHERE length < 6
GROUP BY name

Distinct names and the lowest id:

SELECT name, MIN(id)              --- or MAX(id) for the highest id
FROM table1 
WHERE length < 6
GROUP BY name

Distinct names and a (more or less) random id (this works in MySQL only and no other DBMS):

SELECT name, id            
FROM table1 
WHERE length < 6
GROUP BY name
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But I still want to return the id column value that goes with each distinct name... –  David19801 Jan 8 '12 at 12:57
    
So, what if a name has many id? Which one should be selected? –  ypercube Jan 8 '12 at 12:59
    
ah I see...good question. Now I understand why mysql does not like it. I guess the id of the first instance of that name? –  David19801 Jan 8 '12 at 13:02
    
Michael has it (as does this post 3rd answer. (Though I like all the reasons behind this post so + 1 here too) –  xQbert Jan 8 '12 at 13:07

select id, name from table1 as t0 join ( select distinct name from table1 ) as t1 on t0.name = t1.name;

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Maybe you mean

where length(name) < 6
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