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Consider the first integer is A, A[i] equals i-th digit of A (0-based indexing, from right to left) and the second integer is B , B[i] equals to i-th digit of B (0-based indexing, from right to left).

The lucky sum of A and B is equal to C, C[i] = max(A[i], B[i]). If i is greater than or equal to size of integer, the i-th digit is equal to 0.

For example,

  1. the lucky sum of 47 and 729 is

    max(7,9)=9
    max(4,2)=4
    max(0,7)=7
    answer = 749
    
  2. Similarly, the lucky sum of W = (74, 92, 477)

    max(4,2) = 4
    max(7,9) = 9
    Lucky sum of 74,92 = 94
    Lucky sum of W=(Lucky sum of (94,477))
    

    which is

    max(4,7)=7
    max(9,7)=9
    max(0,4)=4
    

So the lucky sum of w is=497.

The task: we are given an array W, containing n (1<=n<=50) integers.

We have to find a number of non-empty subsequences of W such that the lucky sum of integers in that subsequences is a lucky number (lucky numbers are positive integers whose decimal representation contains only the lucky digits 4 and 7. For example, numbers 47, 744, 4 are lucky and 5, 17, 467 are not.).

Constraint: 0 < W[i] < 1e9

Examples:

  1. W = {4,7}: answer = 3
  2. W = {43, 87 ,44}: answer = 2

Can this problem be solved by dynamic programming?

How this problem can be solved efficiently in C++ ?

share|improve this question
    
Is this a homework? – svick Jan 8 '12 at 13:43
    
Assume you have number of lucky sum in first n-1 numbers in W, now adding last number to sequence just causes to check if it has lucky sum with first n-1 numbers or not, So it's O(n^2) and because n<= 50, it's fast enough. (Am I wrong?) – Saeed Amiri Jan 8 '12 at 13:47
    
@svick ::yeah .... – user1134599 Jan 8 '12 at 13:54
    
@SaeedAmiri the first n-1 numbers may generate lots of different lucky numbers, how do you determine which sub-set to check? – Topro Jan 8 '12 at 14:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's what i can think of(unfinished yet):

Uses DP with bit mask. we now represent a number in the following way: every bit is categorized into five kinds:

  1. (0) -> 0
  2. (1,2,3) -> 1
  3. (4) -> 2
  4. (5,6) -> 3
  5. (7) -> 4
  6. (8,9) -> -1

As we can easily see, whenever a bit is 8 or 9, it can never be added into a valid solution. now we represent the number with bit-mask, which takes 5^8.

So we let f[i][s] denotes the total ways we can choose the subset from the first i numbers to make out the number whose bit-mask is s.

Here is the code i just wrote again.....
Three things remains:

  1. use __int64 or long long instead of int for f[][].
  2. use queue to accelerate enumeration for there are a lot of impossible status(i.e. f[][s]==0) if we enumerate with for (i = 0;i < MAXS;i++).
  3. use f[0..1][MAXS] to reduce memory cost.

The sample code:

#include <queue>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>
#include <algorithm>

#define MAXN 51
#define MAXS 390625 //5^8

using namespace std;

const int exp[] = {1, 5, 25, 125, 625, 3125, 15625, 78125, 390625};
int n;
int w[MAXN];
struct node{
    int i;
    int stat;
    node(int x, int y):i(x),stat(y){}
};
queue<node> q;
__int64 f[MAXN][MAXS];
bool inq[MAXN][MAXS];

int main(){
    //freopen("test.txt","r",stdin);
    memset(f,0,sizeof(f));
    memset(inq,0,sizeof(inq));
    scanf("%d",&n);
    for (int i = 0;i < n;i++) scanf("%d",&w[i]);
    while (!q.empty()) q.pop();
    f[0][0] = 1;
    for (int i = 0;i < n;i++)
        for (int j = 0;j < MAXS;j++)
            if (f[i][j] > 0){
                f[i + 1][j] += f[i][j];
                int stat = j;
                int loc = 0;
                int k = 0;
                for (int p = w[i];p > 0;p /= 10){
                    k = p % 10;
                    if (k <= 0) k = 0;
                        else if (k <= 3) k = 1;
                            else if (k <= 4) k = 2;
                                else if (k <= 6) k = 3;
                                    else if (k <= 7) k = 4;
                                        else k = -1;
                    if (k < 0) break;
                    int bit = stat % exp[loc + 1] / exp[loc];
                    if (k < bit) k = bit;
                    stat = stat - (bit - k) * exp[loc];
                    loc++;
                }
                if (k < 0) continue;
                f[i + 1][stat] += f[i][j];
            }
    int ans = 0;
    for (int i = 0;i < MAXS;i++){
        bool flag = false;
        for (int loc = 7;loc >= 0;loc--){
            int bit = i % exp[loc + 1] / exp[loc];
            if (bit > 0) flag = true;
            if (flag == true && (bit != 2 && bit != 4)){
                flag = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (flag == true) ans += f[n][i];
    }
    printf("%d\n",ans);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Since every bit of the answer is independent. So update them separately and the whole algorithm takes O(n*log10(w))

Here's the code i just wrote:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>
#include <algorithm>

#define MAXL 15

using namespace std;

int n;
int ans[MAXL];

int main(){
    int i,j,w;
    scanf("%d",&n);
    memset(ans,0,sizeof(ans));
    while (n--){
        scanf("%d",&w);
        i = 0;
        while (w>0){
            j = w % 10;
            ans[i] = max(ans[i], j);
            i++;
            w /= 10;
        }
    }
    bool flag = false;
    for (i=MAXL-1;i>=0;i--){
        if (ans[i] > 0) flag = true;
        if (flag) printf("%d",ans[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This just computes the lucky sum of a sequence of numbers. The actual question is more complicated than that. – svick Jan 8 '12 at 14:58
    
@svick i realized that, sorry for the misunderstanding, i am now reconsidering this problem. – Topro Jan 8 '12 at 15:02

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