Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand this program, I don't get why number is initialized to 1 when the program takes user input. This is how I understand the program which is obviously wrong:

You enter the factorial number, lets says I enter 6, it goes to the while loop because 6 is greater than 1. Now factorial is 1, and number is 6, 6 * 1 = 6. Then 6 - 1 = 5, so factorial is 5 but i get 720 as output.

i don't think I understand the while loop

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    // declaration of the variables
    int factorial, number;

    // initialization of the variables
    factorial = 1;
    number = 1;

    // Prompt the user to enter the upper limit of integers
    cout << "Please enter the number of the factorial";
    cin >> number;

    // using the while loop find out the factorial
    while (number > 1)
    {
        factorial = factorial * number;
        number = number - 1;
    }
    cout << "The factorial is " << factorial;
}
share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

You are missing a "<" in last line of the program. It should be

cout<<"The factorial is "<<factorial;

After making this change when I compile and run the program it works for me correctly i.e computes the correct factorial. For example factorial of 5 i.e 5!=5*4*3*2*1=120

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your program works correctly.

6! = 6 * 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 = 720.

Btw, use recursion for such recursive problems.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    //declaration of the variabe
    unsigned int number;

    //prompt the user to enter the upper limit of integers
    cout << "Please enter the number of the factorial";
    cin >> number;

    cout << factorial(number);

    return 0;
}

unsigned int factorial(unsigned int n)
{
    if (n <= 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return n * factorial(n-1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or use a look-up table, which allows for O(1) complexity (as opposed to O(n) complexity). Here is an example of a look-up table implementation: gist.github.com/1578501. –  user142019 Jan 8 '12 at 14:18
    
Look-up tables does not solve the problem if the input domain is infinite :) But yes, I know how to use a look-up table and it's better when you already know the input domain. –  m0skit0 Jan 8 '12 at 14:20
add comment

The initial assignment of number is indeed unnecessary. However, you should check the input operation for errors:

int factorial = 1;
int number;

if (!(std::cin >> number))
{
    /* error! */
    return 1; // i.e. abort the program
}

while (number > 1) { /* ... */ }
share|improve this answer
add comment

First of all, it is initialised to 1 because of the following condition:

Factorial(0) = 1
Factorial(1) = 1

So if a user inputs a number less than 2, you do not need some calculations, you just output 1

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first thing I noticed was that there is an error in your code:

cout<<"The factorial is " < factorial;

should be:

cout<<"The factorial is " << factorial;

Correcting this should fix a compile error.

The essence of this code is:

  1. Get a number (int number) from user
  2. Print print the factorial of number
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.