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Here I wrote Java code to display duplicate numbers in a text file. Here I hardcoded the path name of text file. I assumed that text file contains only numbers in every line of text file.

And I like to display only those numbers which are repeated. Code is as shown below:

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class FileRead {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    HashMap<String,String> lines=new HashMap<String,String>();

    try{
        FileInputStream fstream=new FileInputStream("C:/Users/kiran/Desktop/text.txt");
        DataInputStream in=new DataInputStream(fstream);
        BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));
        ArrayList arr=new ArrayList();
        String str,str1;
        int i=0;
        while((str=br.readLine())!=null){
            i++;
            str1=Integer.toString(i);
            if(lines.containsValue(str)){
                System.out.println(str);
            }else{
                lines.put(str1, str);
            }
        }
        in.close();
    }catch(Exception e){
        System.out.println(e);
    }

}
}

Contents of text file is as shown below:

 56
 75
 1
 46
 100
 97
 75
 46
 46

Expected output is:

 75
 46

This is the output I'm getting:

 75
 46
 46

I'm not able to find out the error in the program. Can anyone help me??

share|improve this question
    
the sop you have written will print when ever duplicates are encountered, –  Inv3r53 Jan 8 '12 at 14:01
    
straight fwd way could be - you could maintain map as , key-number, value-number of occurences, then the keys with value >1 are duplicates. –  Inv3r53 Jan 8 '12 at 14:02
1  
@Inv3r53 there is even more simple than that, you can use a Set's .add() return value for the job, see below –  fge Jan 8 '12 at 14:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You needed to keep track of what you have printed, for example in a HashSet<String>.

Declare Set<String> seen = new HashSet<String>() at the top, then add an if:

if(lines.containsValue(str)){
    if (seen.add(str)) {
        System.out.println(str);
    }
} else {
    lines.put(str1, str);
}

An even easier solution is to remove else:

if(lines.containsValue(str)){
    System.out.println(str);
}
lines.put(str1, str);
share|improve this answer
    
Can I do it without using Hash Set?? –  Kiran Bhat Jan 8 '12 at 14:21
    
@KiranBhat Yes, please see the update. But you really should replace HashMap with HashSet, because you are misusing the map in your solution. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 8 '12 at 14:33

You are better off using a Set:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    final Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
    // Here a LinkedHashSet is used, this allows to print duplicates in
    // their order of appearance in the source file
    final Set<Integer> duplicates = new LinkedHashSet<Integer>(); 

    try{
        FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream("C:/Users/kiran/Desktop/text.txt");
        DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(fstream);
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));

        String str;
        int i;

        while((str = br.readLine())!=null){
            i = Integer.toString(str);

            // set.add() will return false if the set is NOT modified -- ie, her
            // it will return false if the integer is already there. Hence, dup.
            if (!set.add(i))
                duplicates.add(i);
        }
        in.close();

        for (final int dup: duplicates)
            System.out.println(dup);
    } catch(Exception e) {
        System.out.println(e);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I already tried it.. But I wanted to use only one datastructure. –  Kiran Bhat Jan 8 '12 at 14:22
    
As you wish, but at least this solution works. And is probably faster than yours ;) –  fge Jan 8 '12 at 14:28

The problem is with this chunk of code:

 if (lines.containsValue(str)){
     System.out.println(str);
  } else {
      lines.put(str1, str);
  }

46 is repeated 3 times in the file. The first time, lines does not contain 46, so it will be added to lines. The second and third times, it will be printed on the screen, as lines already contains 46.

share|improve this answer

You're error is a logical one. The number 46 appears three times in the next file. After you first encounter it, it will be present in the hash, and thus print out to the screen when you encounter it for the second and third time.

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