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I have written a simple Javascript function (curteousy of codecall.net) that creates a count down timer.

It works fine when I run it, but I want to have more than one timer on the page.

When I place the function inside another div I get the numbers on the screen but only one of the last function actually counts down.

I have placed a link to the code here in JsFiddle which for one reason or another doesn't want to run it but it works. I just need multiple instances of it.

Any help is much appreciated, thanks in advance

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The reason it doesn't work is because jsFiddle automatically wraps it in an onload handler. –  minitech Jan 8 '12 at 16:48
2  
Here's the jsFiddle with the issues fixed up: jsfiddle.net/minitech/s7x2d/2 –  minitech Jan 8 '12 at 16:50
    
Thanks for sorting the jsFiddle issue. Any idea how to actually create 2 instances –  user866190 Jan 8 '12 at 17:03
    
Yes, in fact, I was working on one. Just answered. –  minitech Jan 8 '12 at 17:04
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The way you built it, all in the global namespace, makes it very difficult to incorporate two timers. Instead, you should just use a reusable object constructor. Demo here.

function Countdown(element, time) {
    this.element = element;
    this.time = time;
}

Countdown.time = function() {
    return new Date().getTime() / 1000;
};

Countdown.formatRemaining = function(timeRemaining) {
    function fillZero(n) {
        return n < 10 ? '0' + n : n.toString();
    }

    var days = timeRemaining / 60 / 60 / 24 | 0;
    var hours = timeRemaining / 60 / 60 | 0;
    var minutes = timeRemaining / 60 | 0;
    var seconds = timeRemaining | 0;

    hours %= 24;
    minutes %= 60;
    seconds %= 60;

    return days + ' day' + (days === 1 ? '' : 's') + ' ' + fillZero(hours) + ':' + fillZero(minutes) + ':' + fillZero(seconds);
};

Countdown.prototype.update = function() {
    var timeRemaining = this.time + this.start - Countdown.time();

    if(timeRemaining > 0) {
        this.element.innerHTML = Countdown.formatRemaining(timeRemaining);
    } else {
        this.element.innerHTML = "Time's up!";

        if(this.timer) {
            clearInterval(this.timer);
            this.timer = null;
        }
    }
};

Countdown.prototype.start = function() {
    var countdown = this;

    this.start = Countdown.time();
    this.timer = setInterval(function() {
        countdown.update();
    }, 1000);

    this.update();
};
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thanks minitech, I am new to javascript and I can see where you instantiated the object. I want this to run from a php foreach loop, so would I have a seperate instantiation for each element in the loop? or would I they be in the javascript file... –  user866190 Jan 8 '12 at 17:12
    
@user866190: It's a versatile class, you can use it almost exactly as you were doing before; new Countdown(document.getElementById(elementId), timeInSeconds).start();, in the same place you were doing it. If need be. When you start getting further into JavaScript, though, you should use HTML classes to accomplish this. –  minitech Jan 8 '12 at 17:13
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