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I have this C macro:

#define syscall(number) \
({ \
    asm volatile ( \
        ".set noreorder\n" \
        "nop\n" \
        "syscall "#number"\n" \
    );\
})

It works great when I call it with integer:

 syscall(5);

However when I do something like this:

 #define SYSCALL_PUTC 5

 syscall(SYSCALL_PUTC);

I get this error:

Error: Instruction syscall requires absolute expression

How do I work around this? I don't want to have my code littered with magic numbers.

Thanks for help!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use stringification like this:

#define xstr(s) str(s)
#define str(s) #s
#define syscall(number) \
({ \
    asm volatile ( \
        ".set noreorder\n" \
        "nop\n" \
        "syscall "xstr(number)"\n" \
    );\
})

For more info on stringification, see this gcc page:

http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Stringification.html

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Works great. Thanks ouah! –  Matěj Zábský Jan 8 '12 at 17:33
    
@MatějZábský you're welcome! –  ouah Jan 8 '12 at 17:35

A bit of a hack, but not THAT much: make a copy of your original syscall macro for each syscall number, naming each for that syscall. Thus, you'd have a macro named SYSCALL_PUTC which would expand into the same as syscall(5) would have.

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A possible alternative would be to make your syscall line in your syscall macro contitional based on the number, so that you won't have any assembly lines that reference the parameter directly. Not sure if your compiler will like that any better, though. –  Scott Hunter Jan 8 '12 at 17:13

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