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What are the best (more or less mature, supporting more advanced logic, having acceptable performance, scalable to some extent) open source Semantic Web libraries and tools (RDF storage, reasoning, rules, queries) for Python nowadays? Historically Python tools (cwm) were among the first to appear, but it still seems that everyone uses Java back-ends for performance and Python as mere client if at all. My purpose is to learn the technology and maybe some future use in production system if it proves itself up to the task. The task is not yet defined, but as I see it its building a knowledge base, linked with some external resources, and customized facet-navigable web front-end.

If some building blocks based on Python are not good enough, then what is the suitable piece from Java/C/C++/whatever world.

Typical stack is also of interest, if there are one or two clear winners.

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A survey of of Python libraries and tools for Semantic Web programming is available here. It includes libraries for working with RDF as well as Python-friendly triple stores.

Toby Segaran's book Programming the Semantic Web also has a lot of programming examples in Python.

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Thank you! The "Survey of Pythonic tools for RDF and Linked Data programming" is exactly what I was looking after. I only wonder why it never popped high enough while I was searching for "python semantic web"... –  Roman Susi Jan 10 '12 at 18:00
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The link has changed. The correct one is: michelepasin.org/blog/2011/02/24/… –  Kaniabi Jun 14 '13 at 18:53
    
Thanks, fixed the link. –  Gerrit Jun 17 '13 at 8:27
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You could check out the pyswip. It could work with the SWI-Prolog. Wish it would fit for requirement. :)

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Thanks! SWI Prolog is quite capable even for large volumes of facts. Hopefully, the power is not limited by bridging to Python. –  Roman Susi Jan 1 '13 at 16:39
    
Also interesting link, which helped me stackoverflow.com/questions/6327167/… –  Roman Susi Jan 13 '13 at 7:46
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