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A while back I compiled two versions of a code, one using (Nullable<T>)x.GetValueOrDefault(y) and one using (Nullable<T>)x ?? y).

After decompiling to IL I noticed that the null coalesce operator is transformed into the GetValueOrDefault call.

Since it's a method call to which an expression can be passed that is evaluated before execution of the method, y seems to be always executed.

For example:

using System;

public static class TestClass
{
    private class SomeDisposable : IDisposable
    {
        public SomeDisposable()
        {
            // Allocate some native resources
        }

        private void finalize()
        {
            // Free those resources
        }

        ~SomeDisposable()
        {
            finalize();
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            finalize();
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
    }

    private struct TestStruct
    {
        public readonly SomeDisposable _someDisposable;
        private readonly int _weirdNumber;

        public TestStruct(int weirdNumber)
        {
            _weirdNumber = weirdNumber;
            _someDisposable = new SomeDisposable();
        }
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        TestStruct? local = new TestStruct(0);

        TestStruct local2 = local ?? new TestStruct(1);

        local2._someDisposable.Dispose();
    }
}

Seems to result into an indisposed object, and probably performance implications too.

First of all, is this true? Or does the JIT or something alike change the actually executed ASM code?

And secondly can someone explain why it has this behavior?

NOTE: This is just an example, it is not based upon real code, and please refrain from making comments like 'this is bad code'.

IL DASM:
Okay, when I compiled this with .Net Framework 2.0 it resulted in identical code with calling null coalesce and GetValueOrDefault. With .Net Framework 4.0, it generates these two codes:

GetValueOrDefault:

.method private hidebysig static void  Main() cil managed
{
  .entrypoint
  // Code size       19 (0x13)
  .maxstack  2
  .locals init ([0] valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32> nullableInt,
           [1] int32 nonNullableInt)
  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldloca.s   nullableInt
  IL_0003:  initobj    valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>
  IL_0009:  ldloca.s   nullableInt
  IL_000b:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_000c:  call       instance !0 valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>::GetValueOrDefault(!0)
  IL_0011:  stloc.1
  IL_0012:  ret
} // end of method Program::Main

Null Coalesce:

.method private hidebysig static void  Main() cil managed
{
  .entrypoint
  // Code size       32 (0x20)
  .maxstack  2
  .locals init (valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32> V_0,
           int32 V_1,
           valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32> V_2)
  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldloca.s   V_0
  IL_0003:  initobj    valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>
  IL_0009:  ldloc.0
  IL_000a:  stloc.2
  IL_000b:  ldloca.s   V_2
  IL_000d:  call       instance bool valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>::get_HasValue()
  IL_0012:  brtrue.s   IL_0017
  IL_0014:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_0015:  br.s       IL_001e
  IL_0017:  ldloca.s   V_2
  IL_0019:  call       instance !0 valuetype [mscorlib]System.Nullable`1<int32>::GetValueOrDefault()
  IL_001e:  stloc.1
  IL_001f:  ret
} // end of method Program::Main

As it turns out that this is no longer the case, and that it skips over the GetValueOrDefault call altogether when HasValue returns false.

share|improve this question
    
If y is a call to a method that results in an object that needs to be disposed then you have a leak there in any case that x is null. –  M.Babcock Jan 8 '12 at 19:46
    
@M.Babcock Not really a leak, just a postpone of clearing up the memory. And look at the revised example, I'm hoping this'll explain the issue better. –  Aidiakapi Jan 8 '12 at 20:07
    
Actually I said that wrong, if local is not null and the method is actually called then you would have leak because the result would be collected from the GC without being disposed. To answer the question of whether the method is actually being called every time, you could put a breakpoint in the method and run it. –  M.Babcock Jan 8 '12 at 20:17
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

After decompiling to IL I noticed that the null coalesce operator is transformed into the GetValueOrDefault call.

x ?? y is transformed into x.HasValue ? x.GetValueOrDefault() : y. It is not transformed into x.GetValueOrDefault(y), and it would be a compiler bug if it were. You're right, y should not be evaluated if x is not null, and it isn't.

Edit: If the evaluation of y can be proved free of side effects (where "side effect" includes "throws an exception"), then a transformation to x.GetValueOrDefault(y) wouldn't necessarily be wrong, but it's still a transformation that I don't think the compiler performs: there aren't all that many situations where that optimisation would be useful.

share|improve this answer
    
I performed this test a long time ago using the .Net Framework 2.0 compiler, I also did some more resource, and from the reference code supplies by MS it's clear that GetValueOrDefault returns the internal value directly, while get_Value performs a check first, that's most likely why it chooses for GetValueOrDefault instead of get_Value. Thank you :) –  Aidiakapi Jan 8 '12 at 20:38
    
Yes, the Value property getter is basically if (!HasValue) throw; return GetValueOrDefault(); -- so there's little point in calling it if you've already determined whether the nullable object has a value :) –  hvd Jan 8 '12 at 21:09
    
Or to be exact if (!HasValue) throw...; return value;. While GetValueOrDefault() is return value;. Quite interesting that it's valid because of the immutability of (most) structs, it simply has to recreate the Nullable<T> wrapper around T so there's not much use to checking HasValue in the GetValueOrDefault() since the struct automatically starts out defaulted to all bits 0. –  Aidiakapi Jan 8 '12 at 22:25
    
I wanted to correct that and say it starts out default(T), but in the one case where it matters, traditionally, that isn't true: C++/CLI pointer-to-members have a nullptr value that differs from all-bits-zero, and their default isn't nullptr. Interesting. –  hvd Jan 8 '12 at 23:00
    
But the default(T) is all-bits-zero, and just like an Enum, the default value is always 0 even though that doesn't even have to be a correct value for the Enum (keep this definition in mind: enum Something { Value1 = 1, Value2 = 2 } default value: 0) –  Aidiakapi Jan 9 '12 at 21:34
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