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Should I register a custom validator in faces-config.xml if I'm using JSF 2.0.4? My custom validator uses Validator interface which is javax.faces.validator.Validator.

<cc:myComp id="customcomp1" ... />

<cc:myComp id="customcomp2" ...>
    <f:validator id="myvalidator" for="myComp" />
</cc:myComp>

myComp.xhtml

<cc:interface>
    <cc:attribute ... />
    <!-- more attributes -->
</cc:interface>
<cc:implementation>
    <h:panelGroup layout="block">
        <h:inputText id="firstName" ... />
        <h:inputText id="middleName" ... />
        <h:inputText id="lastName" ... />
    </h:panelGroup>
</cc:implementation>
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You seem to be using a custom component or a composite component. You need to show how you have created it. Perhaps you simply didn't delegate the validator properly. –  BalusC Jan 9 '12 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As per the code example in your updated question, you seem to not be delegating the validator to the right input at all, so the validator is simply ignored altogether.

You need to define the desired input (for which you'd like to attach a validator) as a <composite:editableValueHolder> in the <composite:interface>.

<cc:interface>
    <cc:editableValueHolder name="forName" targets="inputId" />
    ...
</cc:interface>
<cc:implementation>
    ...
    <h:inputText id="inputId" ... />
    ...
</cc:implementation>

The above <composite:editableValueHolder> basically tells that any <f:validator for="forName"> must be applied on the <h:inputText id="inputId">. So, the following should then do it:

<cc:myComp>
    <f:validator id="myValidator" for="forName" />
</cc:myComp>

You can even use the same value in name and targets, but the key point is that there must be a <composite:editableValueHolder> present so that JSF knows on what input component exactly the validator should be targeted, there can namely be more than one input component in the composite, you see.

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Thank you so much! –  User49234123412341 Jan 9 '12 at 15:41
    
You're welcome. –  BalusC Jan 9 '12 at 15:42
    
1up for you and Chichiray. :) –  User49234123412341 Jan 9 '12 at 15:50

No. That is not necessary with Jsf 2.0. Just annotate your validator with @FacesValidator. The annotation registers your validator automatically. No xml needed.

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For some reason my validator doesn't work. Please check the edit –  User49234123412341 Jan 9 '12 at 4:12

If you are working with JSF 2, I don't think you need to touch the faces-config.xml file to create a customer Validator. You can simply use the annotation @FacesValidator to declare a Validator. It should be something like this:

@FacesValidator("myValidator")
public class MyValidator implements Validator {

    @Override
    public void validate(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, Object value) throws ValidatorException {
        // Your logic
    }

}

Then you can start using it in your .xhtml page with, for instance, <f:validator> tag:

<f:validator validatorId="myValidator" />
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I did exactly as mentioned above in the myValidator class but still it's not being called. –  User49234123412341 Jan 9 '12 at 4:19
    
Please check the update in my question. –  User49234123412341 Jan 9 '12 at 4:21
    
@Altair: can you post the code for your Validator as well as your composite component? A Validator should be registered for a single input, not the whole component. –  Mr.J4mes Jan 9 '12 at 5:17

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