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#include <pthread.h>
#define NUM_THREADS 10

void *work(void *i){
      int f = *((int *)(i));
      printf("Hello, world from %i with value %i\n",
             pthread_self(), f);
      pthread_exit(NULL);
}
int main(int argc, char **argv){
      int i;
      pthread_t id[NUM_THREADS];
      for(i = 0; i < NUM_THREADS; ++i){
            if(pthread_create(&id[i], NULL, work, (void *)(&i))){
                  printf("Error creating the thread\n"); exit(19);}
      }
      return 0;
}

the output is supposed to be :

Hello, world from 2 with value 1
Hello, world from 3 with value 2
Hello, world from 6 with value 5
Hello, world from 5 with value 5
Hello, world from 4 with value 4
Hello, world from 8 with value 9
Hello, world from 9 with value 9
Hello, world from 10 with value 9
Hello, world from 7 with value 6
Hello, world from 11 with value 10

this is again not a homework . its some code i run into in some reference but posix is not my field so i just want what's enough to understand this
my questions are :

  • what does this mean int f = *((int *)(i)); ??? i mean pointers written like these i cant understand them
  • what does this mean (void *)(&i))
  • does pthread_create return a zero or non-zero value in success? -in the output let's take line one for example how come there is value 1 !! isn't it supposed to be zero since i is zero
  • does ++i affect this output?
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1  
Firstly, please ask one question at a time, and secondly, learn about function pointers and also refer to the documentation for the functions you are using. –  Arafangion Jan 8 '12 at 21:02
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3 Answers

what does this mean int f = *((int *)(i)); ???

It casts i to an int *, dereferences it, and assigns the value to f.

what does this mean (void *)(&i))

It takes a pointer to i and casts it to void *.

does pthread_create return a zero or non-zero value in success?

pthread_create returns zero on success.

in the output let's take line one for example how come there is value 1 !! isn't it supposed to be zero since i is zero

You'd think so, but it isn't. Each thread is executing asynchonously from all the others, and is reading the value of i at the time it runs, not at the time it was launched; as such, the results are actually unpredictable. The program you're running here looks like it's supposed to demonstrate this exact effect.

does ++i affect this output?

Uh... yes? The loop would not terminate without it.

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great answer but does this explain 9 being printed three times and 5 being printed twice?? –  Armagadon Jan 8 '12 at 21:18
    
Like I said, "the results are actually unpredictable". They depend on the exact order in which threads run. –  duskwuff Jan 8 '12 at 21:35
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what does this mean int f = *((int *)(i));

int f = *((int *)(i)); means cast i to an int*, and then dereference this pointer to get the int value at the address. You can break it down into two steps:

int *temp = (int*)i;
int f = *temp;


what does this mean (void *)(&i))

(void *)(&i) simply casts the address of i (in main that's an int*) to a void*.

does pthread_create return a zero or non-zero value in success?

From the man pages:

RETURN VALUE

  On  success,  pthread_create() returns 0; on error, it returns an error
  number, and the contents of *thread are undefined.


in the output let's take line one for example how come there is value 1 !! isn't it supposed to be zero since i is zero

You're passing a pointer to i to the thread function, and since the main thread and this new thread are running in parallel, i can be updated in the for loop (++i) before it's accessed in work.


does ++i affect this output?

Yes, it's the argument being passed to your thread function. It's the number after "...with value" in the output.

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well about ++i : why is the first printed value 1 and not 0 and why is 5 printed twice and also 9 ??!! –  Armagadon Jan 8 '12 at 21:11
    
++i is a prefix operator, it increments the value then returns the new, incremented value. By contrast, i++ returns the value, then increments it. –  Arafangion Jan 8 '12 at 21:15
    
@Armagadon: Sorry for the late reply. You're not waiting for a thread to finish before continuing with the loop and incrementing i. The only thing you can be certain about is that the number being printed is greater than or equal to i, since you're passing a pointer to i. It's the same reason as the second last point in my answer. –  AusCBloke Jan 8 '12 at 22:06
    
@Arafangion well how come it is greater than or equal to i see line 9 ,, 6 is printed while the preveious value was 9 –  Armagadon Jan 8 '12 at 22:48
    
@Armagadon: The value 6 is from thread number 7. –  AusCBloke Jan 8 '12 at 23:01
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Firstly, let's see:

f = *((int *)(i));

Since i is a void *, it can't be legally dereferenced, so it's first casted to an int *, which dereference gives a value of type int, as expeced. asting the address of i to a void * is the reverse of this operation; since a pthread function accepts a void *, but an address of an int is of type int *, this cast is nice to be done.

pthread_create return zero on success: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/007908799/xsh/pthread_create.html

Yes, ++i affects the output, as it increments i by one, thus the next dispatched thread function will be supplied as argument with a value greater than that of the the former call's. That's why 'value' is incrementing during the program.

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well about ++i : why is the first printed value 1 and not 0 and why is 5 printed twice and also 9 ??!! –  Armagadon Jan 8 '12 at 21:11
    
Because ++i evaluates to i+1, whereas i++ evaluates to i, and both statements increase the value of the variable. (this is what is called "pre-increment" and "post-increment". The answer for your second question is @duskwuff 's answer: threads are not guaranteed to be created one-by-one, exactle one after another. They take the variable's value whenever they're created. –  user529758 Jan 8 '12 at 21:15
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