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I have the following powershell script

$list = invoke-sqlcmd 'exec getOneMillionRows' -Server...
$list | % {
    GetData $_ > $_.txt
    ZipTheFile $_.txt $_.txt.zip
    ...
}

How to run the script block ({ GetDatta $_ > $_.txt ....}) in parallel with limited maximum number of job, e.g. at most 8 files can be generated at one time?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The Start-Job cmdlet allows you to run code in the background. To do what you'd ask, something like the code below should work.

foreach ($server in $servers) {
    $running = @(Get-Job | Where-Object { $_.State -eq 'Running' })
    if ($running.Count -le 8) {
        Start-Job {
             Add-PSSnapin SQL
             $list = invoke-sqlcmd 'exec getOneMillionRows' -Server...
             ...
        }
    } else {
         $running | Wait-Job
    }
    Get-Job | Receive-Job
}

Hope this helps.

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1  
In order to throttle the cue at 8 and to keep pushing another job on the stack as another finishes I think you'll need $running | Wait-Job -Any. –  Andy Arismendi Jan 9 '12 at 0:33
2  
Wait-Job -Any: "Displays the command prompt (and returns the job object) when any job completes. By default, Wait-Job waits until all of the specified jobs are complete before displaying the prompt." –  Andy Arismendi Jan 9 '12 at 0:41
    
Not sure what ($server in $server) does here. But I got the ideal. –  dc7a9163d9 Jan 9 '12 at 5:54
    
BTW, it seems Where-Object { $_.JobStateInfo.State -eq 'Running' } can be Where-Object { $_.State -eq 'Running' }? –  dc7a9163d9 Jan 9 '12 at 7:38
    
In the example case they wanted to so something on multiple servers, so that is foreach ($server in $severs). And yes, you can write the where-object using the scriptproperty State as well. –  Start-Automating Jan 9 '12 at 20:21

It should be really easy with the Split-Pipeline cmdlet of the SplitPipeline module. The code will look as simple as this:

Import-Module SplitPipeline
$list = invoke-sqlcmd 'exec getOneMillionRows' -Server...
$list | Split-Pipeline -Count 8 {
    GetData $_ > $_.txt
    ZipTheFile $_.txt $_.txt.zip
    ...
}
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I like this module a lot. But the only external variable available inside the pipeline block is $_; how do you pass other variables into the pipeline block? $a = "foo"; $list | Split-Pipeline {# $a is undefined in here} –  Myrddin Emrys Jul 2 '13 at 15:29
1  
Used variables and functions from the current runspace have to be explicitly imported to parallel pipelines using the parameters -Variable and -Function. Eventually, hopefully soon, I will mention this in the cmdlet help or provide an example. –  Roman Kuzmin Jul 2 '13 at 16:37
    
Thank you Roman. I figured this out after asking the question, and posted the suggestion in GitHub about mentioning this in the documentation. This is a very useful tool, and it sped up the task I was running tremendously. Thank you. –  Myrddin Emrys Jul 2 '13 at 21:00

Background jobs is the answer. You can also throttle the jobs in the run queue using [System.Collection.Queue]. There is a blog post from PowerShell team on this topic: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/powershell/archive/2011/04/04/scaling-and-queuing-powershell-background-jobs.aspx

Using queuing method is probably the best answer to throttling background jobs.

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The example in the link seems only run three jobs. –  dc7a9163d9 Jan 10 '12 at 23:41
    
Yeah, that is an example. You can modify it to your needs. –  ravikanth Jan 11 '12 at 3:24
    
It actually will run all the tasks. Comparing with @start-automating's method, it doesn't need a polling loop. –  dc7a9163d9 Jan 11 '12 at 19:49

Same idea as user "Start-Automating" posted, but corrected the bug about forgetting to start the jobs that are held back when hitting the else clause in his example:

$servers = @('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n')

foreach ($server in $servers) {
    $running = @(Get-Job | Where-Object { $_.State -eq 'Running' })
    if ($running.Count -ge 4) {
        $running | Wait-Job -Any | Out-Null
    }

    Write-Host "Starting job for $server"
    Start-Job {
        # do something with $using:server. Just sleeping for this example.
        Start-Sleep 5
        return "result from $using:server"
    } | Out-Null
}

# Wait for all jobs to complete and results ready to be received
Wait-Job * | Out-Null

# Process the results
foreach($job in Get-Job)
{
    $result = Receive-Job $job
    Write-Host $result
}

Remove-Job -State Completed
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